Department of Social Sciences and Humanities

Dr. Edwin Taylor, Chairperson
etaylor8@missouriwestern.edu
(816) 271-4403
missouriwestern.edu/social-sciences-and-humanities/

The Department of Social Sciences and Humanities is an interdisciplinary department the covers a wide range of related disciplines. Those disciplines include Economics, History, Humanities, Sociology, Philosophy, and Political Science. The courses offered by the faculty contribute to the general education of students at Missouri Western in addition to providing students with transferable skills that contribute to their workforce readiness once they complete their degree programs at Missouri Western.

Social Science and Humanities Disciplines

Economics

The discipline of Economics studies the ways in which people make choices as they assume the various roles of consumer, worker, small business owner, business or non-profit manager, investor, government policymaker, and the like. The manner in which the economy is organized determines the opportunities available to individuals for achieving their goals in a wide variety of areas, and it is one of the key factors affecting the quality of life in any society. Recently, with the increasing reliance upon free market economic principles at home and around the globe, students across the country have demonstrated a renewed interest in the study of economics. The background they acquire will serve them well whether they are preparing for careers in business, government or the non-profit sector, or plan to enter graduate school or law school.

History

History is the study of change over time. While people often think of history as the study of warfare and great leaders, everything, every place, and everyone has a history; politics, economics, sexuality, medicine, religion, law, and the natural world are just a few of the major sub-fields of history. The discipline of history prepares students to understand how transformation takes place over time. It is also a scientific discipline that requires critical analysis of different types of data and evidence-based interpretation. The study of history develops skills in contingent thinking and the valuing and synthesis of multiple perspectives, preparing students to better understand the reasons for human and natural diversity and to envision alternate futures. Through course work, internships, and experiential learning opportunities, history majors at Missouri Western develop skills that prepare them for careers in arenas such as finance, law, government, education, public and social service, and in arts and cultural institutions such as museums, libraries, and archives.

Humanities

Humanities courses focus on the study of core texts typically considered central to the development of the western cultural tradition, while also providing some exposure to works from non-western cultures. These courses offer students opportunities to examine human intellectual and cultural history from the perspective of the studia humanitatis formulated during the Renaissance period of modern western history as well as the "cultural studies" orientation of more recent post-structuralist thinkers. Students minoring in humanities may use the four core courses offered either to enhance their major coursework, if they are majoring in a "humanistic" discipline, or they may combine these courses with those from fields of study commonly identified as humanistic, including history, languages and literature, and philosophy, or those in the visual arts, music, and drama.

Philosophy

The philosophy faculty is committed to cultivating student inquiry into all of the major areas of traditional western philosophical inquiry, including logic, metaphysics, epistemology, and the value areas of ethics and political theory, aesthetics and the philosophy of art, and the philosophy of religion. This commitment is realized primarily through the development of courses that offer students opportunities to examine philosophical issues and debates drawn from both historical and contemporary sources. Courses in philosophy thus promote the development of critical thinking skills and the ability to communicate well-reasoned personal beliefs clearly in both written and oral discourse, both in and outside the classroom. Students who major in philosophy can apply these skills and their experience in career areas such as law, business, and the health professions or to graduate study in fields such as philosophy, theology, and nursing.

Political Science

The discipline of Political Science studies political institutions, the political behavior of groups, and the political behavior of individuals within groups. More specifically, the discipline of Political Science includes the study of American and foreign entities, political history, constitutional and policy issues, interest groups, and the media. Although the field is sufficiently diverse to cover virtually any topic of a political nature, a traditional curriculum comprised of several subfields is widely recognized and is included in the Political Science major at MWSU.

Religion

Students in religion explore the beliefs and practices of humanity: from the Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, to the Chinese traditions of Confucianism and Daoism; from the Samsaric religions of Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism, to the variety of small-scale and indigenous traditions around the world. Building on a core of regional surveys, the religion minor includes courses in Jewish and Christian Biblical studies, Islam, and the philosophy of religion, as well as topical courses that examine relevant themes across a wide selection of world traditions.

Sociology

Sociology is the study of group life, social interaction, and relationships in society. Sociology deals with issues relevant to people and social life. Sociology is concerned with such topics as: marriage and the family; urban and rural life; crime; social class; race and ethnicity; sex and gender; demographic changes; environment; technology and communication-to name a few.  Sociology addresses these and other pressing contemporary issues by applying both a specific body of theory as well as the systematic methods of scientific research.

*Effective Fall 2020, program(s) in this department are being phased out and have a 3-year teach out plan. More information can be found here. 

Admission Requirements

Majors in the department which have admission requirements are listed below. Majors which are not listed on this page do not have specific requirements for admission. Information about the recommended coursework a student might take prior to declaring the major can be obtained from the department.

History

Students desiring this major should declare their interest to the chairperson of the Department of History and Geography so that they can be assigned History faculty advisors. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 to declare this major.

History (Education)

  • ACT composite score on file
  • ACT composite score of 20 or higher or successful completion of the Missouri General Education Assessment (MoGEA)
  • Overall GPA of 2.75
  • Education course GPA of 3.0
  • Content area GPA of 3.0
  • Satisfactory completion of EDU 202/203

ACT and/or MoGEA scores should be received the semester before application for admission to teacher education is made (up to 4 months should be allowed for scores to be process.

Political Science

Students desiring to major in Political Science must formally declare a major by meeting with a Political Science faculty member and complete a Pre-Declaration of Major form. Applicants will be assigned a Political Science faculty advisor at that time. Applicants must have completed the following courses before their major applications will be processed: PSC 101 American National Government and ENG 104 College Writing and Rhetoric, with a grade of C or higher in each. 

Economics (ECO) 

ECO 101  Current Issues in the Economy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Introductory course covering current economic events and economic problems facing society. Topics include health care, the environment, crime and poverty, globalization, and recession and growth in the national economy. As the economic aspects of these issues are explored, the student is introduced to the methods used by economists to analyze problems and to develop possible solutions.

CORE 42: MOTR ECON 100; Introduction to Economics

ECO 260  Principles of Macroeconomics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Introduction to basic principles of economics with emphasis on the analysis of unemployment, GDP, inflation, and public debt; discusses fiscal and monetary theories and public policies.

CORE 42: MOTR ECON 101; Introduction to Macroeconomics

ECO 261  Principles of Microeconomics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Introduction to economic fundamentals with emphasis on supply and demand analysis, factor markets, different market structures, international economics, and various economic problems.

CORE 42: MOTR ECON 101; Introduction to Microeconomics

ECO 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Economics     Credits: 1-6

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research methods in Economics. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving economics-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval.

ECO 300  Statistics for Economics and Social Sciences     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Basic statistical techniques emphasizing economic and social science applications. Topics covered include data summary techniques, elementary probability theory, sampling and sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of General Studies math requirement other than MAT 110 or MAT 110E.

ECO 310  Agricultural Economics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Analysis of the evolution and status of the agricultural sector of the economy. Domestic and export markets will be analyzed, as will impact of agricultural policy. Special emphasis will be directed to the Midwestern regional economy as influenced by the agricultural food chain.

ECO 360  Intermediate Macroeconomics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Intermediate-level theory course examines determinants of GDP, employment, and inflation; emphasizes economic model building (both classical and Keynesian) and the use of monetary and fiscal policies to control business cycles and inflation. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260.

ECO 361  Intermediate Microeconomics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Theoretical approach to the behavior of the individual buyer and seller in the marketplace; includes consumer demand theory, costs of production, and market structures ranging from pure competition to monopoly. Prerequisite(s): ECO 261.

ECO 362  Public Finance     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Studies principles of taxation and public expenditures, impact of fiscal policy on economic and social activity, and recent trends in public finance at the federal, state, and local levels. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 and ECO 261.

ECO 363  Money and Banking     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Summer.

Course Description: Continuation and expansion of money and banking concepts introduced in ECO 260; includes money, banks, and other financial intermediaries, the Federal Reserve System, concepts of monetary control, monetary policy, and international banking. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260.

ECO 364  Labor Economics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Introductory course dealing with the institutional aspects of the American labor force, its organization, wage and employment theory, the economic role of bargaining, and the basic ingredients of public policy toward labor organizations. Prerequisite(s): ECO 261.

ECO 365  Government Regulation of Business     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Analyzes the legislative and legal control of business and its implications for the various economic components of the American economy. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 and ECO 261.

ECO 367  Urban and Regional Economics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Examines economic growth in the United States with emphasis on the problems of economic growth in the Midwest; looks at factors instrumental in determining economic growth in various segments of the economy; considers urban problems associated with growth. Prerequisite(s): ECO 261.

ECO 375  Economics of Health Care     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Examines the application of economic theory to the health care industry. Topics include the demand for health and health care, the market for health insurance, managed care, the market for health care practitioners, hospital services, and pharmaceuticals, and the role and operation of Medicaid and Medicare. Current proposals for reform of the health care system and of government health care policy will be carefully examined. Prerequisite(s): ECO 261.

ECO 376  Economics of the Environment     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Application of economic principles and insights to environmental issues, and to the development of potential remedies. Areas of examination include valuing the environment and sustainable development, natural resource economics (incl. energy, water, and biodiversity), and environmental economics (incl. air, land, and water pollution, and poverty and development). Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or ECO 261.

ECO 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-6

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Declared Economics major, a minimum of 2.5 GPA in major field, and departmental approval.

ECO 460  Business and Economic Forecasting     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Basic and intermediate forecasting of business and economic variables. Forecasting of business variables such as sales, production, and stock prices. Economic forecasts of GDP, unemployment, and consumer prices. Techniques include judgmental methods, trend calculation, smoothing techniques, time series methods, and regression analysis. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 and either ECO 300, GBA 210, MAT 111 or MAT 111E.

ECO 461  International Trade     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Introduction to the theory of international economics, with an emphasis on economic models of trade and on economic arguments for and against the use of trade barriers. The course examines the changing nature of international economic institutions and increasing world economic interdependence. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 and ECO 261.

ECO 462  History of Economic Thought     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Development of various schools of economic thought: includes classical, neoclassical, institutional, Keynesian, and neo-Keynesian theories. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260.

ECO 463  Comparative Economic Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Introduction to the comparative study of national economic organization. Analysis of alternative patterns of reliance on national economic planning versus market activity. Examines experiences in different types of national economies such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden, Japan, the republics of the former Soviet bloc, and China. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260.

ECO 464  Econometrics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduces methods and statistical tools utilized by economists to perform basic and applied research. Regression analysis is the focus, with emphasis on both theoretical issues and problems encountered in application. Students will experience the research process firsthand, with ample opportunities to collect and analyze their own data. Prerequisite(s): Either ECO 260 or ECO 261 and either ECO 300, GBA 210, MAT 111 or MAT 111E.

ECO 466  Economics in Action     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: In-depth study of one of the following specialty areas in economics taught on a rotational basis each semester offered. Content will cover such topics as: Economics of Crime and Justice, International Finance, Mathematical Economics, Economics of Sport, or Economics and the Media. Course may be repeated for credit up to five times with different topics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or ECO 261.

History (HIS) 

HIS 120  Modern World History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A survey of the political, social, and economic history of the world (Europe, Africa, Middle East, India, Far East, and Latin America) from 1815 to the present.

CORE 42: MOTR HIST 202; World History II

HIS 140  American History to 1865     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The discovery of America to the end of the Civil War; colonial America, the Revolution, national development, sectionalism, and the Civil War.

CORE 42: MOTR HIST 101; American History I

HIS 150  American History since 1865     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Continuation of HIS 140. Reconstruction, industrialization, urbanization, emergence as a world power, progressivism, World War I, the New Deal, World War II, and postwar America.

CORE 42: MOTR HIST 102; American History II

HIS 200  Ancient and Medieval Civilization     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The western world from antiquity to the fifteenth century; the emergence of civilization in the Nile and Tigris-Euphrates valleys; the political, social, economic, and intellectual contributions of Greece, Rome, and medieval Europe.

CORE 42: MOTR WCIV 101; Western Civilization I

HIS 210  Early Modern Civilization     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The western world from 1500 to 1815; national states, the geographical revolution, the founding of European oversee empires, the Reformation, the emergence of constitutional governments, the Scientific Revolution, and the American French Revolutions.

CORE 42: MOTR WCIV 102; Western Civilization II

HIS 220  History of Missouri     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Missouri under French and Spanish rule; the American acquisition; the role of the state in the slavery crisis and in the settlement of the West; the state's contributions to politics, art, literature, education, industry, and transportation.

HIS 230  Modern Europe: 1789 to the Present     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The French Revolution and Napoleonic periods; reaction, nationalism, and revolution; rise of socialism; imperialism; World War I; the Russian Revolutions and Soviet communism; the rise of fascism; Hitler, Stalin, and World War II; the Holocaust; the postwar bi-polar world order; the bloc system.

CORE 42: MOTR WCIV 102; Western Civilization II

HIS 235  Historic Preservation Field School     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Intensive field experience in documenting and preserving an existing built environment as well as the historic landscape. Students actively participate in a survey of an urban neighborhood. Class sessions consist of lecture, discussion, field work, and lab. Lecture and discussion cover a wide array of issues in historic preservation. Field work includes tours, inspection, photography, and documentation of historic buildings. This course may be taken more than once for credit as an elective, but only once to fulfill a requirement for the major in either the B.A. or B.S. program in History.

HIS 245  History of the Middle East in the Twentieth Century     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An examination of the historical developments in the Middle East since 1900, with special attention to the origins of current political, social, and economic issues in a region plagued by instability.

HIS 290  The Historian's Craft     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course introduces students to the methods used by historians to analyze, interpret, and write about the past. Students will learn basic skills which may include, but are not limited to: locating and assessing source material; analyzing primary and secondary sources; writing analytical, comparative, historiographical, and review essays; conducting oral interviews; conducting oral presentations; reviewing movies. Various thematic approaches will be offered. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 or HIS 150, and HIS 200 or HIS 210 or HIS 230, and ENG 104, and must be a declared major or minor in history.

HIS 300  American Colonial History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: The founding of North American colonies by Spain, France, and Great Britain; cross-cultural interactions between Europeans and Native Americans; race and slavery; religious diversity; economic growth; imperial conflicts; British colonial administration and the path to Revolution. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 301  Early National Period     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Transition from colonial settings to constitutional republic; birth of political parties; Jeffersonian republicanism; Native American conflicts; race and slavery; women's expanded opportunities; War of 1812; economic growth and transportation innovations; Jacksonian democracy. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 302  Antebellum America     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Postwar expansion; rise of American nationalism and the growth of the West; revival of the two-party system; Jacksonian democracy; humanitarian crusades; the Mexican War. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 305  The American Frontier     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Westward expansion of the United States over three centuries; colonial frontier, trans-Appalachian frontier, trans-Mississippi frontier; significance of the frontier in American history. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 306  American Women's History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the study of women in American history from the colonial era through the 20th century, with particular emphasis on the everyday experiences of ordinary women, including women's work, family life, religious experiences, health, and sexuality. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 308  African American History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course surveys major themes in African American History starting with enslavement through the Long Civil Rights movement of the 20th century. Will focus on how freedom expanded and contracted for African Americans as well as the various strategies of protest and self-expression they used to gain equality and justice. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 310  English History to 1688     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of major facts and interpretations of the history of England from the Roman era through the Glorious Revolution; emphasis on political events, social institutions, and cultural developments that shaped the ancient, medieval, and early modern English past. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 210, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 311  Race, Science, Medicine Am His     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course explores the complex relationship of medicine and science in the construction of race in American history. Will explore the concept of race in early anthropology, monogenism and polygenism, enslavement, eugenics, and the rise of IQ and DNA testing among other topics. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 320  English History since 1688     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An examination of major facts and interpretations of the history of England from the Glorious Revolution to the present; emphasis on evolution of parliamentary government and the rise and decline of the British Empire. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 and HIS 230, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 325  American Economic History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: English mercantilism, laissez-faire and its effect on American economic development, the emergence of the corporation and the trust, the issue of government regulation, and the role of the government in the economy of today. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 330  Recent United States History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: United States since 1945; wartime mobilization; rise of American hegemony; Cold War anticommunism; Civil rights; suburbanization; gender politics; cultural rebellions; Great Society; Conservative ascendency; Globalization; war on terror, Great Recession. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 334  Selected Topics in Ancient History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: This course will study the political narrative as well as the intellectual, religious and social history of the cultures that defined the ancient Mediterranean world. Each semester it is offered will focus on one of the following: Ancient Middle East, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, or another ancient topic. In addition to learning the political and social events of these cultures, students will read and discuss a number of primary sources from these civilizations focusing on their indigenous meaning as well as their impact on Western Civilization. May be repeated with departmental approval for a total of 9 credit hours if course content varies significantly. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 290.

HIS 335  Medieval Europe     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of Medieval European history focusing on the medieval origins of modern European institutions. Students will read several historical monographs in order to understand the narrative of medieval history and to gain a greater knowledge about how modern historians write about the medieval past. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 210, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 336  The Crusades     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of the origin and history of the wars fought between Christendom and Islam in the Middle Ages. Emphasizes the history of these wars from the perspective of all the cultures involved as well as the influence of the idea of the crusades and crusading on medieval and modern thought. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 210, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 339  Europe 1815-1914     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Europe from the Congress of Vienna to 1914; reaction and revolution, nationalistic movements, rise of socialism-communism, the diplomatic background of World War I. Prerequisite(s): HIS 230 and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 340  Recent European History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Europe in World War I, the rise of dictatorships, the League of Nations, new alignments, World War II, and the postwar period. Prerequisite(s): HIS 230 and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 342  The Russian Kingdom and Empire 1462-1917     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Restoration of the Russian kingdom by Ivan III "the Great;" establishment of royal absolutism by Ivan IV "the Terrible;" the Time of Troubles; emergence of the Russian empire; invasion by Napoleon; expansion of empire; collapse of the monarchy. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 and HIS 230, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 345  Military History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: The historical development and application of military strategy, tactics, doctrine, and technology from ancient times to the present. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 or HIS 150 or HIS 200 or HIS 210 or HIS 230, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 350  History of East Asia     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: East Asia and the Pacific from antiquity to the present. Topics may include religion, politics, economics, impact of European and American traders and missionaries, interactions with European empires, resistance to Westernization, and the emergence of contemporary China, Japan, and Pacific nations. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 or HIS 230, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 355  Study Abroad in History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An intensive three-week upper-level course in European history. A special fee is assessed for the course. This course is only taught in the summer. Deadline for application is March 1. This course may be taken more than once for credit as an elective, but only once to fulfill a requirement for an upper-level course for the major in either the B.A. or B.S. program in History. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 or HIS 210 or HIS 230.

HIS 365  Methods of Teaching Social Studies     Credits: 5

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Principles and methods of teaching social studies in secondary school: objectives, problems, materials, and methods applied to the social studies curriculum. Methods include electronic portfolio, website technology, and traditional lesson plans/unit plans for each discipline involved. Those disciplines include economics, geography, government and political science, history, psychology, and sociology. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. Must be taken prior to Junior Teaching Experience.

HIS 370  History of Latin America     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A survey course including pre-Columbian cultures, colonial period, independence movements, national developments, relations with the United States and Europe. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 or HIS 210, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 375  The American Revolution     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Imperial-colonial conflicts; declaring independence; political, social, economic, religious, and military considerations of war; the Confederation period; constitutional drafting and ratification. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or department approval.

HIS 380  The French Revolution and Napoleon     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Old Regime France; the origins of the French Revolution; political, social, religious, and cultural reforms; political shifts from monarchy to republic to dictatorship; popular and state-sanctioned violence; counter-revolution; the Terror; the Directory; the rise of Napoleon; the Napoleonic Wars; the impact of the French Revolution and Napoleon on the world. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 and HIS 230, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 383  European Colonialism and Imperialism     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course examines the impact that European colonialism and imperialism had on Europe and the world between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries. We will begin with an examination of first contact between Europe and the Americas. We will then examine the evolution of European colonies during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The next stage of the course will examine the decline of the early modern colonial empires in the face of revolutionary movements and the rise of the new imperialism in the nineteenth century. The course will conclude with an examination of the decline of European states as imperial powers in the twentieth century and the legacy and long-term impact of European colonialism and imperialism. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 and HIS 230 and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or department approval.

HIS 385  U.S. Constitutional History     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An examination of the social, economic, political, and legal developments related to the United States Constitution; emphasis on constitutional foundings, balance of federal and state authorities, protection of individual liberties, and racial and gender equality. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140, HIS 150, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 390  Heresy, Witchcraft, and Magic in Pre-Modern Europe     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Examines the evolution of religious beliefs and practices in pre-modern Europe. Particular attention is given to how definitions of heresy, witchcraft, and magic changed over time and methods used by Church and State to enforce religious conformity. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 210, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 400  Civil War and Reconstruction     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Westward expansion; U.S.-Mexican War; sectional crises and coming of the Civil War; slavery and abolition; political, social, and economic developments in the Civil War; African-American freedom; political, social, and economic effects of the nation's reconstruction. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 420  History of Africa     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: North Africa in the ancient world; Africa during the age of geographical discoveries; nineteenth-century European imperialism; the emergence of modern African states. Prerequisite(s): 6 credits from among HIS 200, HIS 210, or HIS 230, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Completion of major-minor declaration in history major or minor, minimum 2.5 GPA in major field, grade of C or higher in HIS 290, and departmental approval.

Humanities (HUM) 

HUM 203  Humanities: Ancient and Medieval     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The social and intellectual history of humanity as reflected by literature, art, music, drama and discourse from the classical period to the Renaissance.

CORE 42: MOTR WCIV 101; Western Civilization I

HUM 204  Humanities: Middle Ages to the French Revolution     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The social and intellectual history of humanity as reflected by literature, art, music, drama and discourse from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution.

CORE 42: WCIV 102; Western Civilization II

HUM 205  Humanities: American Revolution to the Present     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The social and intellectual history of humanity as reflected by literature, art, music, drama and discourse from the American Revolution to the present.

CORE 42: WCIV 102; Western Civilization II

HUM 314  Technology And Society     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Participatory course emphasizing a particular problem and/or issue related to technology and society. Class participants will investigate the semester's theme using currently available technologies. Same as BIO 314, ENG 314, PSY 314, PSC 314. Prerequisite(s): Completion of category one -- Basic Skills General Studies courses.

HUM 360  Selected Readings in the Humanities     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Specialized course work in the humanities of western civilization; emphasizes analysis of humanistic works of leading authors. Course may be repeated for up credit with departmental approval. Prerequisite(s): HUM 203, HUM 204 or HUM 205, or departmental approval.

HUM 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Consent of departmental chairperson is required. Students are normally expected to discuss proposed work with HUM faculty two semesters before registration is anticipated. May be repeated with departmental approval for a maximum of 6 credits.

Leadership (LDR) 

LDR 140  Introduction to Leadership     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course provides a comprehensive background on different styles of leadership and of the knowledge base that is needed by anyone in a leadership position.

LDR 145  Leadership Challenges     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The course is designed to assist students who exhibit exemplary leadership potential and help them sharpen their leadership skills. Each week, a new leadership topic will be presented and discussed with an expert guest or a panel discussion relating to the topic. Students will be able to further develop their leadership skills in relation to positions they may currently hold, or wish to hold, apply leadership skills to the world, and understand the importance of "giving back" to the community as exemplified by the lives of community leaders.

LDR 300  Selected Topics in Leadership Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Selected Topics in Leadership Studies is designed to be offered according to specialized area of investigation of a selected topic or problem in leadership studies that is not listed in the catalog. May be repeated for credit for each different topic. Students may not repeat a topic twice. Prerequisite(s): Program Director's approval.

LDR 450  Student Leadership Independent Project     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course is a directed program, and is designed to prepare students for leadership roles in their current or future professional environments, in their community, as well as in their personal life. The course is designed as an independent project proposed by a student to be completed under the supervision of an academic faculty. The course will investigate a leadership relevant issue whereby the student is required to research a topic independently. The topic must be agreed upon by the faculty supervisor.

LDR 490  Leadership Practicum     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course serves as the capstone course for the Leadership Minor and enables the student to delve into leadership in a particular field of his or her interest. Student projects and readings will explore specific examples and styles of leadership. Guest speakers will talk about their personal experience as leaders including what they have learned. Students are required to obtain a leadership position and report on it as part of this course.

LDR 500  Survey of Leadership     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course introduces a variety of theoretical models that focus on leadership and decision making. It surveys the literature on leadership styles, traits and behavior theory of leadership, shared leadership, and assessing decision making. It also surveys the concepts, theoretical components, principles, and practices of various organizations (e.g., for and not for profit organizations) and their leadership strategies.

LDR 525  Team Building     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The course is designed to teach effective methods for creating teams, and methods of bringing out the best performance in a group. The course focuses on the major theoretical models for designing teams and their development. The course also investigates the dynamics and stages of team building, evaluates challenges that a team faces during its lifetime, conflict management, and the characteristics of ineffective or under-performing teams.

Philosophy (PHL) 

PHL 210  Introduction to Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Survey of the origins and development of philosophical thought focusing on texts selected from the classical, medieval, modern and contemporary periods.

CORE 42: MOTR PHIL 100; Introduction to Philosophy

PHL 219  Reasoning and Argumentation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Introduction to the skills necessary to construct and evaluate deductive and inductive arguments for use in a variety of disciplines, professions and everyday life. Topics include identifying valid forms of arguments, formal and informal methods of evaluation and the use of these skills when reading and writing. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104.

CORE 42: MOTR PHIL 101; Introduction to Logic

PHL 220  Symbolic Logic     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to a symbolic language for representing the structure of valid arguments. Introduces formal rules for demonstrating the validity of arguments. Covers natural deduction for sentential and predicate calculus. Prerequisite(s): ACT math score of 20 or higher or the equivalent.

CORE 42: MOTR PHIL 101; Introduction to Logic

PHL 230  Ethics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An introduction to ethical theory focusing on the major traditions of Western philosophical ethics and their practical application to contemporary moral issues.

CORE 42: MOTR PHIL 102; Introduction to Ethics

PHL 231  Healthcare Ethics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An introduction to ethical theory focusing on the major traditions of Western philosophical ethics and their practical application to contemporary moral issues in healthcare.

CORE 42: MOTR PHL 102; Introduction to Ethics

PHL 232  Business Ethics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An introduction to ethical theory focusing on the major traditions of Western philosophical ethics and their practical application to contemporary moral issues in business.

CORE 42: MOTR PHIL 102P; Introduction to Ethics- Business and Professional

PHL 257  Theory and Criticism of Visual Culture     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: A practical, experience-based multi-disciplinary introduction to contemporary and classic approaches to art theory and criticism. Same as ART 257. Prerequisite(s): ART 100 or ART 205 or CIN 100 or ENG 210 or ENG 220 or HUM 203 or HUM 204 or HUM 205 or MUS 101 or THR 113.

PHL 260  Philosophical Research     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An introduction to the methods of philosophical research, including the analysis and interpretation of primary texts, the use of secondary sources, and formal models of oral and written presentation; the course will focus on the study of a canonical text or topic. May be repeated with departmental approval for a total of 6 credits if course content varies significantly. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy.

PHL 301  Ancient Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Survey of ancient philosophy from the pre-Socratics to Hellenistic thought with particular emphasis placed upon philosophies of Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 302  Medieval Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Survey of the major figures and problems that developed within medieval philosophy with emphasis upon Augustine, Anselm, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 304  Modern Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Survey of major figures and movements in modern philosophy selected from the early modern period through the end of the eighteenth century. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 305  Topics in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Survey of a selected movement or trend in nineteenth and twentieth century philosophy such as German idealism, American pragmatism, phenomenology and existentialism, and the analytic tradition. May be repeated with departmental approval for a total of 6 credit hours if course content varies significantly. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 308  History and Philosophy of the Natural Sciences     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: A study of the history of the natural sciences with an emphasis on the philosophical analysis of these events. Same as CHE 308 and BIO 308. Prerequisite(s): Completion of General Studies Mathematics and Natural Sciences requirements.

PHL 310  Political Theory     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Political theories of classical thinkers, Plato and Aristotle; of church fathers, Augustine and Aquinas; and of modern theorists, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill; Marxism and Fascism. Same as PSC 310. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 or any previous course in philosophy or humanities.

PHL 312  Contemporary Political Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Political theories since the mid-twentieth century to the present including movements such as libertarianism, neo-conservatism, neo-liberalism, communitarianism, feminism, and environmentalism. Same as PSC 312. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 or any previous course in philosophy or humanities.

PHL 316  Philosophy of Law     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: This course will survey several of the central schools of thought in the philosophy of Anglo-American jurisprudence. To do this, we will consider five major questions: What is law? What, if any, connection is there between law and ethics? When should law be used to restrict the liberty of individuals? To what extent should democratic states permit civil disobedience? What justifies inflicting punishment on those who violate the law? Same as LAT 316. Prerequisite(s): Any previous philosophy course.

PHL 325  Ethics of Environmental and Natural Resource Policy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A study of alternative theories of environmental ethics, the implications of these theories for natural resource and wildlife policy, and their application to some contemporary natural resource and wildlife management issues. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 330  Topics in Ethical Theory     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Survey of major theoretical alternatives in western philosophical ethics with reference to contemporary trends in ethical theory. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 335  Aesthetics and the Arts     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Survey of modern views of aesthetic experience and the arts with reference to classical and contemporary views. Same as ART 335. Prerequisite(s): A grade of B or higher in HUM 203 or HUM 204 or HUM 205 or PHL 210; or ART 257 or PHL 257.

PHL 350  Philosophy of Religion     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Study of classical and contemporary philosophical inquiry into the nature of religion and questions about God and ultimate reality. Same as REL 350. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 353  Philosophy of Biology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: An introduction to current issues in the philosophy of biology such as the nature of biological organization, classification, and living systems and some of the problems that have arisen in the attempt to understand these complex systems. Same as BIO 353. Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 or BIO 105 or BIO 106.

PHL 360  Selected Topics in Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Specialized course work focusing on individual figures, movements, recent trends or topics in philosophy. May be repeated with departmental approval for a total of 6 credit hours if course content varies significantly. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 365  Selected Topics in Peace & Conflict Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Specialized course work in interpersonal and/or international conflict studies. May be repeated as content varies for a maximum of 9 credits.

PHL 370  Selected Topics in Comparative Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Specialized course work in non-Western philosophy. May be repeated as content varies for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Same as REL 370. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

PHL 435  Foundations of Professional Ethics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A study of ethical issues that arise in various professions. The course surveys ethical theories and their application to contemporary issues in professions as well as moral aspects of decision making. Each version of the course focuses on ethical issues in a different profession. These include but are not limited to ethics in leadership, healthcare, business, engineering, criminal justice and legal professions, and natural resource ethics. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy.

PHL 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Consent of departmental chairperson is required. Students are normally expected to discuss proposed work with PHL faculty two semesters before registration is anticipated. May be repeated with departmental approval for a maximum of 6 credits.

PHL 535  Foundations of Professional Ethics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A study of ethical issues that arise in various professions. The course surveys ethical theories and their application to contemporary issues in professions as well as moral aspects of decision making. The course focuses on ethical issues in different professions. These include but are not limited to ethics in leadership, healthcare, business, engineering, criminal justice and legal professions, and natural resource ethics. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in any graduate program.

Political Science (PSC) 

PSC 100  Current Issues in Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: The course will explore current issues in a broad context, with an emphasis on actors, institutions/organizations, and processes that shape them, and consider the context of each issue, along with the connections between and across many of these issues. Possible policy solutions will be explored, along with a consideration of the role that government and politics have in shaping and addressing the challenges of these issues.

PSC 101  American National Government     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: The American constitutional system, including Congress, the presidency, and the courts; and public issues.

CORE 42: MOTR POSC 101; American Government

PSC 110  American State and Local Government     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Colonial and revolutionary origins of state government; state constitutions; referendum, initiative, and recall procedures; state legislatures; governors; state courts; county and municipal governments. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 111  Understanding the Missouri Constitution     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: This course provides students with an overview of the Missouri Constitution. Includes a discussion of federalism, the historical development, key constitutional structures and the Missouri Bill of Rights. The course is open to transfer students needing to complete the state mandated graduation requirement for knowledge of the Missouri Constitution.

PSC 200  International Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The nature of politics at the international level; the national state system and state capabilities; foreign policy objectives, formulation, and execution; international organizations and alignments; contemporary world tensions. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

CORE 42: MOTR POSC 201; International Relations

PSC 210  Comparative Political Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Structural-functional analysis of major European political systems; comparison and contrast among such systems and with others of contemporary significance. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

CORE 42: MOTR POSC 202; Introduction to Comparative Politics

PSC 280  Scope and Methods     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: The way political scientists work; the scientific basis for the discipline of Government; the history, approaches, and major sub-fields of Government and the quantitative and qualitative research methods used to analyze politics. Prerequisite(s): MAT 111 or MAT 111E.

PSC 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Government     Credits: 1-2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research methods in political science. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving government-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval.

PSC 300  Voters and Elections     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Evolution of the American two-party system; place of the interest group in decision making through interaction with executive and legislative branches. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and PSC 110.

PSC 310  Political Theory     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Political theories of classical thinkers, Plato and Aristotle; of church fathers, Augustine and Aquinas; and of modern theorists, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill; Marxism and Fascism. Same as PHL 310. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 or any previous course in philosophy or humanities.

PSC 312  Contemporary Political Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Political theories since the mid-twentieth century to the present including movements such as libertarianism, neo-conservatism, neo-liberalism, communitarianism, feminism, and environmentalism. Same as PHL 312. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 or any previous course in philosophy or humanities.

PSC 314  Technology and Society     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Participatory course emphasizing a particular problem and/or issue related to technology and society. Class participants will investigate the semester's theme using currently available technologies. Same as BIO 314, ENG 314, HUM 314, PSY 314. Prerequisite(s): Completion of Category One -- Basic Skills General Studies courses.

PSC 317  Gender and Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course offers an introduction to feminist analysis and to the consideration of the gender system in a political context and from a political perspective. It invites participants to both read and carry out empirical research and consider the insights and contributions of various paradigms, especially intersectionality.

PSC 320  Public Administration     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Organization theory; bureaucracy; public personnel and policy; issues in American public administration. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 327  Origins of the American Tradition     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: At the intersection of political theory and American politics, this course resembles American Studies in its slightly interdisciplinary focus. It relies on the analysis of early American texts to tease out the lineage of some current political tendencies. It offers useful critical insights to students of American politics, American history, and American society at large. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101

PSC 330  The Politics of the New American City     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: The growth of cities and metropolitan areas; the legal status of local governmental entities; politics and elections and the role of interest groups in governing the metropolis; and the functions and services of urban governments. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 335  Film and Politics     Credits: 4

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: An exploration of the connections between the main themes in American Political Culture and the artifacts of American Popular Culture. Emphasis on the reading of films as texts of American politics and culture.

PSC 340  Latin American Political Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Comparative approach to Latin American political institutions; investigates causes for political instability, revolution, the new military, socialism vs. communism, and economic development and U.S. policy. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and either PSC 200 or PSC 210.

PSC 350  Judicial Process     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An exploration of the judicial process in the United States, including the institutions and considerations that affect the administration of justice under law in the American political system. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and PSC 110.

PSC 355  Interest Group Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An examination of interest groups and the interest group process in the U.S., both in national and state arenas. Attention is given to the role and function of interest groups in society, the interest group process itself, problems, and the use of case studies to illustrate the process in action. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 360  The American Presidency     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: The place of the president in decision making in the American federal system, his constitutional roles, the legal and extra-legal checks on presidential power. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 365  Selected Topics in Peace & Conflict Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Specialized course work in interpersonal and/or international conflict studies. May be repeated as content varies for a maximum of 9 credits.

PSC 370  American Public Policy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A survey of the policy process and specific policies or issues in government selected from a variety of areas, such as crime and punishment, health and welfare, bioethical, education, energy, environment, spending, taxation, civil liberties, immigration, and homeland security. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 374  Exploring War and Peace in the Modern World     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: This class provides an interdisciplinary survey of the root causes of conflicts and methods by which societies can build peace. There is a specific emphasis on the multiple meanings of peace in society and the challenges embedded in contemporary, applied peace-making.

PSC 375  Seminar on Terrorism and Homeland Security     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: This class is a survey of domestic and international terrorism focusing on major terrorist groups and their actions throughout the world. Root causes of terrorism will be examined and domestic and international reactions to terrorism will be explained and evaluated. There is a special emphasis in this class on the U.S. Homeland Security response to terrorism. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 380  Asian Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Comparative approach to Asian politics and culture. This course pays special attention to Japanese governance, culture and leadership as well as emerging governments and economies in Southeast Asia. Relations with the United States are also examined. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 390  International Organizations     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of the role of international organizations in constituting and reconstituting world order with a focus on providing governance under conditions or anarchy. Covers a range of organizations with special attention given to the role of the United Nations in maintaining international peace and stability. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 400  American Foreign Policy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Policy making, the role of the public in decisions, formulation and implementation of national policy, U.S. policy goals in various areas of the world, decision making in crisis situations. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and PSC 200.

PSC 410  American Political Controversies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: The American Congress, its organization, rules, role in law making; the role of interest groups, congressional investigations, and the modern presidency in the legislative process. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 420  Law and Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: The role of the Supreme Court in the American system; judicial review and its significance under Marshall, Fuller, Taft, Hughes, and Warren; majority and minority opinions; the process of decision making. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 426  Peace and Justice in Post-Conflict Societies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: This course addresses issues of building peace in war-torn societies by focusing on a range of political, military, economic, and social challenges and how they intersect with institutions of the state. Emphasis on four separate sectors around which institutionalizing peace are organized: security, justice and reconciliation, governance and participation, and social and economic issues. Special attention is given to connecting the theoretical literature on conflict transition to the applied challenges of post-war societies. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and PSC 200.

PSC 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic or an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Declared political science major, a minimum of 2.5 GPA, and departmental approval.

PSC 490  Capstone Practicum in Political Science     Credits: 3-12

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An integrative, research based capstone experience for senior political science majors. Students arrange an internship with a public agency, governmental organization, or private group or agency that interacts with government subject to the approval of the Department of Economics, Political Science, & Sociology via its political science faculty. The field work will provide first-hand experience with the operations, institutions, and policy concerns of cooperating agencies, organizations, and groups in addition to providing data necessary to complete the original research component of the practicum. Student internship positions in a state or local government setting require PSC 110. Internships must be arranged and approved by the department in the semester preceding the internship. Supervised internships are not offered during summer session. For more details contact the Coordinator of the Internship Practicum in the EPSS department. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and PSC 280.

PSC 491  Political Science Capstone I     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course serves to connect students' experiences in their studies to conceptualizing a research project. Each student will design their own original research. Prerequisite(s): Grades of C or better in the following courses: PSC 101, PSC 110, PSC 200, PSC 210, PSC 280, PSC 310.

PSC 492  Political Science Capstone II     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course is the culmination of the independent, original research project students begin in PSC 491. After completing the research project, students are required to go through an oral defense of their work. Oral defenses for PSC 492 are public and open to faculty and students in EPSS and other cognate disciplines. Prerequisite(s): PSC 491.

PSC 493  Applied Learning Experience     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: his course offers an applied learning experience in public service. Students arrange an applied learning experience with a public agency, governmental organization, or non-profit that interacts with government subject to the approval of the Department of Economics, Political Science and Sociology via its Applied Learning Director. The field work will provide first-hand experience with the operations, institutions, and policy concerns of cooperating agencies, organizations and groups. Applied learning experiences must be arranged with and approved by the Applied Learning Director in the semester preceding the internship. For more details contact the Director of the Public Service Applied Learning Experience in the EPSS department. Prerequisite(s): Junior Standing; PSC 110: State and Local Government

Religion (REL) 

REL 150  Religions of the World     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Summer.

Course Description: Survey of major and minor religions around the world with relevant historical and cultural elements.

REL 250  Religions of East Asia and Oceania     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Survey of major and minor religions with relevant historical and cultural elements, focusing primarily on religious traditions with origins in East Asia and Oceania.

CORE 42: MOTR RELG 100; World Religion

REL 251  Religions of the West     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Survey of major and minor religions with relevant historical and cultural elements, focusing primarily on religious traditions with origins in West Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

CORE 42: MOTR RELG 100; World Religion

REL 252  Religions of South Asia and Africa     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Survey of major and minor religions with relevant historical and cultural elements, focusing primarily on religious traditions with origins in South Asia and Africa.

CORE 42: MOTR RELG 100; World Religion

REL 260  Introduction to Biblical Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Introduction to the method and content of Biblical scholarship, covering the Jewish (Hebrew) Bible and the Christian (Greek) New Testament, with some discussion of relevant apocryphal and non-canonical texts.

CORE 42: MOTR RELG 100; World Religion

REL 263  Religion of the Hebrew Bible     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion .

Course Description: Introduction to the major elements of the Hebrew Bible from the perspective of contemporary biblical scholarship.

CORE 42: MOTR RELG 101O; Religious Texts, New Testament, Old Testament

REL 265  Religion of the New Testament     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to major elements of the New Testament from the perspective of contemporary New Testament scholarship.

CORE 42: MOTR RELG 101N; Religious Texts, New Testament, Old Testament

REL 325  World of Islam: People, Cultures & Societies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An introduction to the fundamentals of Islam, and a survey of cultures, traditions, social life, and history of Islamic societies. The course provides an interpretation of current events in the world of Islam. Special topics of interest would include: the origin and history of Islam; religious life (belief and practices, and observance); Islamic cultures; Islamic arts, literature, and architecture; economic applications of Islam; Islamic laws and theology; marriage and Muslim families; women's rights and position in Muslim families and society; political Islam (Islamic groups: modern and militant Islamic movements, the question of leadership); and, Islam and the West. The course is, however, open to the type of interests that students show in the subject matter. Same as SOC 325.

REL 345  Religion & Society     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of the nature of religion as a social phenomenon, surveying major themes in the sociology of religion, such as the history of attempts to define religion, empirically grounded in the diversity of world religious traditions. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

REL 350  Philosophy of Religion     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Study of classical and contemporary philosophical inquiry into the nature of religion and questions about God and ultimate reality. Same as PHL 350. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

REL 360  Selected Topics in Religion     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Specialized course work in the study of religion, normally a comparative exploration of a theme considered across a variety of global religious traditions. May be repeated as content varies for a maximum of 6 credits.

REL 361  War, Peace, & Religion     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: A course in comparative religious ethics thematically exploring a variety of global religious traditions, both East and West, examining their respective scriptures, doctrines, histories, and contemporary examples through the lens of their various perspective on violence and nonviolence. Special emphasis will be given to the resources each has available for nonviolent responses to interpersonal and international conflict. Same as PAX 361.

REL 365  Selected Topics in Peace & Conflict Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Specialized course work in interpersonal and/or international conflict studies. May be repeated as content varies for a maximum of 9 credits.

REL 370  Selected Topics in Comparative Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Specialized course work in non-Western philosophy. May be repeated as content varies for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Same as PHL 370. Prerequisite(s): Any previous course in philosophy, religion, or humanities.

REL 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Consent of departmental chairperson is required. Students are normally expected to discuss proposed work with REL faculty two semesters before registration is anticipated. May be repeated with departmental approval for a maximum of 6 credits.

Sociology (SOC) 

SOC 110  Introduction to Sociology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: An introduction to the discipline of sociology; basic sociological concepts and theories; a survey of the major topics such as culture, society, social interaction, groups, crime, race/ethnicity, class, gender, the family, education, religion, medicine, economy, politics. Cross-cultural comparisons.

CORE 42: MOTR SOCI 101; General Sociology

SOC 120  General Anthropology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: The bio-cultural evolution of the human species, with emphasis on culture as adaptation for survival; comparison of human non-literate societies, stressing cultural variability, cultural relativity, and similarities between cultures.

CORE 42: MOTR ANTH 101; General Anthropology

SOC 200  Introduction to Archaeology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The language, methodology, theoretical frameworks and history of the field of archaeology, with special emphasis on excavations and their contribution to knowledge of past civilization.

SOC 230  Social Problems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: An analysis of contemporary American social problems, such as poverty, social inequality, crime and law enforcement, health and health care, population and the environment, problems in the family, education, politics and the economy. Global comparisons. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

CORE 42: MOTR SOCI 201; Social Problems

SOC 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Sociology     Credits: 1-2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research methods in sociology. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving sociology-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval.

SOC 300  Selected Topics In Sociology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Specialized area of investigation of a selected topic or problem in sociology that is not listed in the catalog. May be repeated for credit for each different topic. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or departmental approval.

SOC 310  Deviant Behavior     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Introduction to the basic research, theories and topics that characterize this area of Sociology including, but not limited to such topics as substance abuse, sexual deviance, violence, mental illness and other behaviors considered deviant in American society. Cross-cultural comparisons are made whenever possible. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 315  Social Inequality and Stratification: Class, Power and Wealth     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A survey of the nature, causes, and consequences of social inequality in advanced capitalist societies (e.g., North America, Europe, and Japan) and the Third World. Explores the distribution of income, wealth, power, and prestige based on gender, race, age, and physical and other attributes. Investigates the reasons for prosperity and poverty and their effects on life choices, careers, and opportunities. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 325  World of Islam: People, Cultures & Societies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An introduction to the fundamentals of Islam, and a survey of cultures, traditions, social life, and history of Islamic societies. The course provides an interpretation of current events in the world of Islam. Special topics of interest would include: the origin and history of Islam; religious life (belief and practices, and observance); Islamic cultures; Islamic arts, literature, and architecture; economic applications of Islam; Islamic laws and theology; marriage and Muslim families; women's rights and position in Muslim families and society; political Islam (Islamic groups: modern and militant Islamic movements, the question of leadership); and, Islam and the West. The course is, however, open to the type of interests that students show in the subject matter. Same as REL 325.

SOC 330  The Family     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The family as a basic institution; the structure and functions of the modern family in a changing urban environment. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 360  Sociology of Health, Illness and Medicine     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: A sociological analysis of health, illness and medicine; the impact of the physical, social, economic and political factors on the production and distribution of illness, disease, sickness and health care. International comparisons. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 370  Mediterranean Archaeology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Uses the principles of basic archaeology to investigate the history and artifactual remains of the major cultures which occupied the land surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, including the Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Hellenistic and Roman periods. Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or departmental approval.

SOC 373  Sociology of Sport and Physical Activity     Credits: 2-3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Emphasizes the fundamental premise that sport is a microcosm of society. Develops an understanding of the principles that create, sustain, and transform social organizations through sport as well as the structure, processes, and problems of sport as a form of social organization. Investigates how the theory and methodology of sociology can be used to understand the principles of stability and change in the conduct of sport.

SOC 400  Racial and Ethnic Relations     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: An analysis of the major racial/ethnic groups in the United States; group conflicts and their sources such as prejudice, discrimination, ethnocentrism, racism; majority-minority relations; critical issues such as affirmative action, immigration. A brief comparison with other societies such as Canada, Northern Ireland, the Middle East, Brazil, South Africa. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 430  Criminology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Explanations of criminal behavior; relationship between crime and social factors such as social class, age, gender, occupation; types of crimes; crime statistics; crime victims; the criminal justice system: the police, courts, corrections; ethical and other critical issues such as capital punishment, crime and mental illness, juvenile crime and punishment. International comparisons. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 440  Sociological Theory     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: An analysis of both classical and contemporary sociological theories and their application to historical and current events. Prerequisite(s): Completion of nine credit hours in sociology.

SOC 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, declared sociology major, a minimum 3.0 GPA in major field, and departmental approval.

SOC 460  Methods of Social Research     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Tools, methods, ethical and theoretical foundation of research process; investigates hypothesis construction, empirical techniques for collecting and analyzing data, and testing their validity; employs computers and statistical analysis as appropriate to the social sciences. Prerequisite(s): Completion of nine credit hours in sociology (at least 3 credit hours numbered 300 or higher).

SOC 465  Advanced Research Project     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Students will design and conduct an empirical research project focused on a relevant social issue or concern. Same as SWK 465. Prerequisite(s): Any statistics course and a grade of C or higher in SOC 460.

SOC 490  Internship in Sociology     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Acquaints the student with the practical aspect of sociology; encourages sociological thinking. Students study a social issue by working as volunteer interns for an organization, office, or agency in the community. To enroll, the student must submit a proposal to the sociology faculty member who will supervise the internship process. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, declared sociology major or minor, completion of at least 15 credit hours in sociology, a minimum of 3.0 GPA in major field, and permission of the instructor.

Dominic DeBrincat (2015) Associate Professor, History. B.A., University of Michigan-Dearborn; J.D., M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut.

Lane DesAutels (2016) Assistant Professor, Philosophy. B.A., University of Puget Sound; M.A., Western Michigan University; Ph.D., University of Maryland.

Jonathan Euchner (1993) Assistant Professor, Political Science. B.A., University of Northern Iowa; M.A., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., University of Kentucky.

Nathaniel Gallegos (2020) Instructor, Economics. B.S., University of Utah; M.S., New Mexico State University; J. D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; LLM, University of Sand Diego School of Law.

Kara Grant (2019) Assistant Professor, Economics. B.S., Linfield College, Ph.D., Washington State University.

Angela Haas (2015) Associate Professor, History. B.A., Ithaca College; M.A., Ph.D., Binghamton University.

Evan Hart (2017) Assistant Professor, History. B.A., University of Southern Indiana; M.A., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.

Ali Kamali (1996) Professor, Sociology. B.A., National University of Iran; M.A., University of Detroit; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Joachim Kibirige (1991) Professor, Sociology. B.A., Makerere University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Melinda Kovacs (2012) Associate Professor, Political Science. M.A., ELTE, Hungary; M.A., Central European University; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Stanley Jay Lemanski (2012) Associate Professor, History. B.A., Concordia College; M.A., University of Michigan; M.Div., Concordia Seminary; M.A, Ph.D., University of Akron.

David Kratz Mathies (2009) Professor, Philosophy and Religion. B.A., Goshen College; MATS, Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., Boston University.

James Okapal (2005) Professor, Philosophy. B.S., The Ohio State University; M.A., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee.

Edwin Taylor (2010) Chairperson and Associate Professor, Political Science. B.A., M.P.A., Montana State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Oregon.

Sathiavanee Veeramoothoo (2020) Assistant Professor, Economics. B.S., Bryant University; M.B.A., Coventry University; Ph.D., Drexel University.