School of Nursing and Health Professions- Health Professions

Dr. Regan Dodd, Chairperson
rdodd@missouriwestern.edu
(816) 271-4474
missouriwestern.edu/HPER

The Department of Health Professions prepares students in degree programs leading to careers in the healthcare field including a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Information Management, a Bachelor of Science in Population Health Management, a Bachelor of Science in Social Work and an Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant. Additional opportunities include a Bachelor of Science in Physical Education with concentrations in Exercise Science and Personal and Commercial Fitness and a Bachelor of Science in Recreation Sport Management with concentrations in Sport Management and Esports Management. Specific information about all of the degrees are found in this section.

Health, Physical Education & Recreation

Missouri Western's Health, Physical Education, and Recreation program educates and prepares students to engage in careers across the health, sport, recreation, and fitness spectrum. What sets us apart is our commitment to high-impact applied learning experiences. Students will engage in a variety of hands-on learning experiences both in the classroom and professional settings.

The department offers two undergraduate degrees, Physical Education and Recreation Sport Management.

Undergraduates interested in health and fitness can complete a degree in physical education with concentrations in Health/Exercise Science or Personal and Commercial Fitness. Health/Exercise Science students are prepared to pursue careers in sports medicine (pre-physical therapy, pre-athletic training, pre-chiropractic) and a variety of clinical settings as well as personal and commercial fitness settings. Physical Education concentrations prepare students for careers as teachers and coaches.

The multi-billion dollar sport and tourism industries translate into an expanded job market for students interested in Recreation Sport Management. Students majoring in Recreation Sport Management select either a, Sport Management, or Esport Management concentration.

Students may satisfy general studies requirements in category five by taking PED 101, Fitness and Wellness, and one activity course. The Fitness and Wellness course acquaints students with basic knowledge, understanding, and importance of lifelong physical activity and fitness. Students with disabilities that restrict them from the regular activity program may enroll in PED 110, Adaptive Activities as often as needed. Participating in this course will satisfy the general studies activity requirement.

Health Information Management

The School of Nursing and Health Professions offers a one-year Certificate program in Health Information Technology (HIT), a Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management (HIM), and minors in Health Informatics and Information Management (HIIM) and health Data Analytics (HDA). The Bachelor of Science in HIM is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). Graduates from CAHIIM accredited baccalaureate degree programs can take the Registered Health Information Administration (RHIA) exam.

What can I do with a Health Information Management Degree?

Health Information Management coursework prepares confident, innovative, and contributing healthcare professionals who have the ability to identify and utilize a variety of information resources and technologies. HIM professions work across a vast array of roles ranging from analytical to project management to healthcare system management and information governance roles. The baccalaureate degree health information management graduate serves as a pivotal team member in the planning, design, implementation, management, use and evaluation of electronic health records and other electronic information systems. Job responsibilities also include serving as brokers of information services. Among the information services provided are definition of requirements and design for clinical and administrative systems development, data administration, clinical data management, data privacy and security management, decision support and data analysis, management of information-intensive areas such as quality/performance improvement, case management and outcomes measurement as well as management of the health information management departmental services. Baccalaureate degree graduates may hold positions as compliance officer, data quality manager, data sets/nomenclature/classification standards manager, educator, healthcare consumer advocate, privacy/security officer, project manager, reimbursement or revenue cycle manager to name a few.

Practical Experience/Internship

Students gain both theoretical knowledge, and practical experience in healthcare settings to prepare them to respond to the challenge of working in health informatics and health information management. Students should be aware that some courses involve professional practice experiences for a significant number of hours. Because these experiences are usually only available during typical working hours, working students must make arrangements to be absent from their work. Students work closely with their advisors since many of the courses have prerequisites and must be taken in sequence. Some professional management experience sites may require criminal background checks, current medical history, proof of liability insurance, and proof of negative TB tests. Students will be required to travel and may be required to temporarily relocate in order to complete the practical experience. Working students may have to make arrangements to be absent from their work in order to complete class requirements.

Classes are offered in a variety of settings, including web-based learning management system, face to face, and a hybrid method. All HIM core classes are web-based.

Physical Therapist Assistant

The physical therapist assistant performs patient rehabilitation under the supervision of a physical therapist. PTAs treat neurologic, orthopedic and cardiopulmonary dysfunctions, providing pediatric, athletic, and geriatric rehabilitation, treatment for wounds and burns, and more.

The PTA program includes didactic and laboratory preparation, extended opportunity to practice and apply learned skills in affiliated clinical settings, and education necessary for graduates to sit for required state licensing examinations and to function competently as entry-level practitioners.

Four semesters and two summer sessions compose the program. Upon graduation, students receive the Associate of Applied Science degree. PTA students are encouraged to consider the advantages of obtaining a bachelor's degree from Missouri Western.

Admission to the program is limited to one cohort of twenty students every fall.  Admission to the university does not guarantee admission to the program.  Selection is competitive and is based on applicants' grades, ACT (or TEAS or SAT) scores, completion of the Missouri high school core program or equivalent, science and math preparation, letters of recommendation, personal essays, and observation of physical therapy in practice. Application information is available online at www.missouriwestern.edu/pta. Application deadline is March 31st.

Missouri Western’s Physical Therapist Assistant Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).

Population Health Management

The Department of Health Professions offers a Bachelor of Science in Population Health Management with options in Business, Computer Information Systems, Human Health, and Health Informatics. Students interested in pursuing non-clinical careers in healthcare or related settings select an option in their interest area.

Students interested in working with electronic health records and other electronic data management systems may pursue options in health informatics or computer information systems. Students interested in serving as a team member managing health promotion and disease prevention in population subsets may pursue an option in business. Students interested in a career focusing on health and wellness and improved health outcomes in diverse populations may select an option of human health.

Career opportunities include hospital, community and public health, insurance, government, and health care technology settings. All students complete an internship in a field placement of their interest area to enhance their preparation for entering the workforce.

Social Work

The Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) prepares students for beginning generalist social work practice.  Students will have multiple applied learning opportunities, including a semester long practicum, to prepare them to work in the field across a variety of social service settings. Students will be challenged to create a generalist skill set which includes, one-on-one, group, and community work, critical thinking, self-awareness, and communication.  These skills are framed by the profession’s core values of service, social justice, dignity and worth of all individuals, importance of relationships, integrity, and competence. The program offers a variety of electives for expanding a student’s knowledge in specific practice areas.

Missouri Western’s Social Work program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

Partnerships with Graduate Programs

Missouri Western maintains partnerships that provide students the opportunity for early review and preferred acceptance into the Masters of Athletic Training at University of Nebraska Omaha, Masters of Occupational Therapy at Rockhurst University or Doctorate in Physical Therapy at Rockhurst University. Additional details can be obtained through the Department of Health Professions: https://www.missouriwestern.edu/hper.

Majors in the department which have admission requirements are listed below. Majors which are not listed on this page do not have specific requirements for admission. Information about the recommended coursework a student might take prior to declaring the major can be obtained from the department.

Health Information Management

Students desiring to obtain a B.S. degree in Health Information Management should declare their interest to the Program Coordinator. Based on approval from the Program Coordinator, students who have completed health informatics, health information management, or health information technology coursework with a grade of C or higher and an overall GPA of at least 2.5 from a CAHIIM accredited associate's program may receive transfer credit.

Physical Therapist Assistant Program

The PTA program is a competitive entrance program. Application to the program is made separately from application for admission to Missouri Western.

 Application requirement information can be found at www.missouriwestern.edu/pta. . Requirements include a completed application, ACT or TEAS scores, three forms of recommendation, high school/college transcripts, 24 hours of observation, and an essay.

One cohort of 20 is accepted every year. Deadline for application is March 31 for the following fall start.

Population Health Management

Students intending to major in Population Health Management should declare their interest to the School of Nursing and Health Professions so they can be assigned an advisor. Students must have completed and received a grade of C or higher in BIO 101 Principles of Biology, BIO 250 Anatomy and Physiology, CSC 201 Microcomputer Applications, PSY 101 General Psychology, and ECO 261 Principles of Microeconomics and have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher.

Recreation Sport Management

Students must have an ACT of 18 or higher. In addition, a GPA of 2.2 or higher after 60 hours of course work and completed courses in Category One of General Studies with a C or higher.

Social Work

The social work program operates under a selective admissions policy. Students are considered "pre-majors" until they meet the minimum requirements to be accepted as a social work major. Admission to the social work program involves the completion of an application packet. Minimum requirements for admission into the social work major include:

  • Completion of the general studies math requirement.
  • Completion of BIO 101 Principles of Biology (or equivalent).
  • Completion of SWK 250 Introduction to Social Work, SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology, PSY 101 General Psychology, and ENG 108 College Writing and Research with a minimum grade of C in each course.
  • Completion of SOC 230 Social Problems, ECO 101 Current Issues in the Economy, and PSC 101 American National Government.
  • Must have a minimum overall GPA of 2.5.
  • Must have earned a C or higher in all completed SWK prefix classes.
  • Must agree to and conduct themselves in a manner consistent with accepted professional social work practices and the current NASW Code of Ethics (see Social Work Student Handbook).
  • Cannot have exhibited behavior that will infringe on their present or future ability to adequately fulfill professional social work responsibilities. The social work program's admissions committee reserves the right to require applicants to submit additional materials if the Committee questions the student's ability to adequately fulfill professional responsibilities (see Social Work Student Handbook).

Students must complete the social work admission process prior to enrolling in SWK 360 Social Work Practice II and must submit completed application packets no later than the first Friday in October or March. The social work program's admissions committee will review all application packets and interview all applicants. Admission decisions are based on a student's academic performance; professional, personal, and academic conduct; references; and responses to application and interview questions.

Social work majors must successfully complete a second formal application process before entering SWK 480 Practicum in Social Work and SWK 485 Social Work Practicum Seminar.  To be eligible to enroll in SWK 480 Practicum in Social Work and SWK 485 Social Work Practicum Seminar, students must have earned a minimum grade of C in all completed SWK prefix courses and carry a minimum overall GPA of 2.5. Students applying to enter the social work practicum must submit an application and practicum essay (outline available from the Field Education Director), and complete interviews with the Field Education Director and prospective field instructors (agency social workers). Practicum planning regularly begins one or two semesters prior to entering the practicum. While every effort is made to identify those students ready for field practicum, it is the student's responsibility to notify the Field Education Director of his/her intent to apply to the social work practicum. In accordance with Council of Social Work Education standards, MWSU does not grant academic credit, course waivers, or field practicum credit for previous life or work experiences.

Once admitted to the social work program, social work majors are expected to maintain professional and academic standards of conduct. The social work program at Missouri Western reserves the right to place a student on probationary status or remove a student from the major because of violations of these standards (see Social Work Student Handbook).

 Allied Health (ALH)

ALH 106  Medical Terminology     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Medical terms with reference to human anatomy and disease processes for the paramedical professions.

ALH 330  Introduction to Epidemiology and Biostatistics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Focuses on knowledge and concepts as applied to study of population health outcomes. Development of basic understanding of the principles of epidemiology and biostatistics as well as the critical thinking skills to assist in the evaluation of research and assessing the health of a population. Quantitative and methodological analysis and their implications for evidence based medicine, healthcare policy, resource utilization and health systems management are explored. Prerequisite(s): PSY 300 or GBA 210.

ALH 350  Introduction to Population Health     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Introduction to concepts of population health and epidemiology. Focuses on the study of health status indicators as influenced by social, economic and physical environments, personal health practices, individual capacity and coping skills, human biology, early childhood development and health services. Basic principles of epidemiology are explored and applied to the study of population health outcomes. Prerequisite(s): ALH 106, BIO 250, BIO 375, and GBA 210 or PSY 300.

ALH 351  Applied Population Health Management Lab     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Focuses on practical application of Population Health tools within the electronic health record (EHR) and health information exchange (HIE) environments. Application of a population health model including population identification, risk stratification, outreach, engagement, care coordination and evaluation of outcomes. Fundamental concepts will be demonstrated through use of tools specific to analytics, registry, referral, care, network, and contract management as they relate to the population health specialist role. Two hours of lab per week. Prerequisite(s): ALH 350 or concurrent enrollment.

ALH 352  Applied Nutrition     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Principles of normal nutrition through the life cycle and the role of nutrition in health are considered. Nutrition therapy and its role in the prevention and management of disease are also examined. Prerequisite(s): BIO 250.

ALH 365  Special Needs of the Elderly     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: An overview of the special needs of the elderly population. Includes present concerns as well as identifying methods of improving life for the elderly in the future.

ALH 402  Population Health Internship     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An academic program which offers students an opportunity to integrate theories of population health with actual practice. Students spend a minimum of 135 hours in a position in a health care or other approved setting focusing on population health. Anticipated learning objectives are established in a contract agreed to by the student, the on-site supervisor and the course professor. Requires periodic progress reports, supervisor evaluation, and a formal written paper. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): Declared health population major, senior standing, completion of major core courses, a minimum of 2.5 GPA in a major field and consent of instructor.

Health Data Analytics (HDA)

HDA 360  Applied Health Data Statistics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course emphasizes statistical analysis of clinical data, use of healthcare statistical formulas, presentation of data, and application of basic medical research principles. Students are introduced to epidemiological concepts along with examining the use of statistical analysis of clinical data in relation to long-range healthcare planning and statistical reporting. Students will utilize software statistical functions and formulas as well as formatting and organization of data for presentation. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in MAT 111, MAT 111E or PSY 300, CSC 201 and HIF 300 or concurrent enrollment.

HDA 450  Applied Health Data Analytics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Application of data-driven, computer-based tools and data analysis techniques which aid decision-making in healthcare. The course provides students a hands-on approach with the use of open source software and open source data. Examination of statistical methods, analytical tools and processes including data analysis and visualization through case studies and scenarios. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 300, ACT 302 and HIF 420 or concurrent enrollment.

HDA 455  Applied Health Data Reporting     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course provides students an introduction as well as hands-on experience in data visualization. It introduces students to design principles for creating meaningful displays of quantitative and qualitative data to facilitate managerial decision-making. Provides an introductory level of competency on the use of several available software tools that can be used for data visualization. Allows for project-based opportunities to identify, understand, analyze, prepare, and present effective visualizations on a variety of topics. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 300, ACT 302 and HDA 450 or concurrent enrollment.

Health Information Management (HIF)

HIF 132  Pharmacology     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: An introductory course with emphasis on classes of drugs and their primary use. Course work will include indications for the medications, dose and route of delivery of the most frequently prescribed medications in various health care settings. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in ALH 106 and BIO 250.

HIF 200  Health Care Delivery Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Study of the components of the health care delivery system; roles and functions of the hospital's organizational components: the governing board, the administration and the medical staff in various hospital departments. Investigation of the procedures used by the organizations which regulate and accredit hospitals, e.g., The Joint Commission.

HIF 275  Coding and Classification Systems I     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Introduction to medical nomenclature and classification systems, official coding guidelines, data quality, case mix, analysis and ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS using manual as well as automated encoders. To be taken concurrently with HIF 276. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in ALH 106, BIO 250, and HIF 132 and credit or concurrent enrollment in BIO 375.

HIF 276  Coding and Classification Systems I Lab     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Laboratory for application of coding practices learned in HIF 275. To be taken concurrently with HIF 275.

HIF 277  Coding and Classification Systems II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Study and application of CPT and HCPCS coding principles using manual and automated encoders. Diagnosis related groups, ambulatory payment classifications, case mix, and data quality will be integrated throughout the course work. To be taken concurrently with HIF 278. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 275 and HIF 276.

HIF 278  Coding and Classification Systems II Lab     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Provides a laboratory setting for the application of coding practices learned in HIF 277. To be taken concurrently with HIF 277. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 275 and HIF 276.

HIF 300  Health Data Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Focuses on the study of the origin, content, and format of healthcare records across the continuum of healthcare in both traditional and non-traditional settings, including paper, hybrid, and electronic health records and the standards that govern the development of records. Other topics include accreditation and regulatory requirements, methods to assess and retrieve health data and patient records, registries, structure and content standards pertaining to healthcare data sets and data sources, record analysis, and storage and retention. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 200.

HIF 310  Clinical Classification Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Introduction to classification systems, vocabularies, taxonomies, terminologies and the coding and mapping of data by manual or the use of encoders. The students will be exposed to a variety of classification systems and terminologies, specifically ICD-9-CM and CPT/HCPCS, but ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS and SNOMED-CT will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in ALH 106, BIO 250, HIF 200, HIF 132 and credit or concurrent enrollment in BIO 375.

HIF 320  Information Technology and Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Focuses on a study of computer concepts and applications in the management of health information systems. The class emphasizes the role of the health information manager in data storage and retrieval; database querying and data mining techniques; and design and generation of administrative reports using appropriate software. Data security, design of audit trails, participation in risk assessment, contingency planning, data recovery procedures, local and wide area network data definitions, data administration, database structure, data dictionaries, data modeling, and database administration are covered. Also studied are work simplification, system analysis and functional standards. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 300 and ACT 301.

HIF 330  Legal and Ethical Aspects of Healthcare Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Content includes the study of the legal and ethical issues involved in the management and delivery of healthcare services and inter-relationships between institution, physicians, and patients. Topics include release of information, quality documentation, retention of records, HIPAA privacy and confidentiality, ethical standards of practice, fraud and abuse, risk management, contracts, consents, and other current medico/legal issues. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 200.

HIF 350  Quality Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Focuses on the study of history, organization and coordination of facility-wide management and performance improvement processes that involve team and process thinking; outcomes measurement; review of utilization of healthcare and other cost-containment programs; risk management and the application of evaluation techniques. Principles of data collection, preparation, analysis and interpretation of healthcare statistics, will be taught along with statistics used in quality management activities and organizational assessment, vital statistics, and computerized statistical packages. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in MAT 110 or MAT 110E, MAT 112, or MAT 116, HIF 300 and HIF 330.

HIF 371  Professional Management Experience I     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Focuses on assignments to promote competency levels required of entry-level health information management professionals and to integrate basic knowledge and to begin the transition required to function as a manager. Many assignments will be completed in a lab setting utilizing records, encoders, and software necessary for practical applications of management skills. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 310, and HIF 330, can be taken concurrently with HIF 320 and HIF 350.

HIF 379  Revenue Cycle and Reimbursement Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The course will cover various reimbursement practices and payment methodologies, processes for reporting and billing, reimbursement terminology, including revenue cycle and chargemaster management. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 300 and HIF 310.

HIF 410  Human Resources and Operations Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Focuses on human resources management practices and strategic leadership management. Topics include staffing, employee development, training, benefits, employer relations, recruitment, work measurement, change management, project management, and human factors. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in MGT 350.

HIF 420  Clinical Data Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Focuses on acquiring, managing, manipulating, analyzing, and reporting data retrieved from a variety of sources, such as electronic health records, patient care systems, claims management data, and traditional coded data in order to provide data for healthcare decision making. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 300, HIF 350, and HIF 379. (Declared majors in Population Health Management are exempt from prerequisites for this course).

HIF 430  Applied Health Informatics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Focuses on various clinical, administrative, and specialty systems applications, such as administrative, clinical decision support systems, electronic health record and computer-based health record systems, nursing, ancillary service systems, patient numbering systems at master and enterprise levels. Apply systems development and systems life cycle concepts to the selection of healthcare information systems. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 320.

HIF 440  Financial and Resource Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Builds on the study of healthcare organizations and their management. Topics include problem solving and decision making, establishing performance and production monitors, knowledge of financial management concepts and accounting principles essential for managing health information management departments, operations, and cost-benefit analysis for resource needs. Course also includes the reimbursement cycle from patient registration to claims billing with an emphasis on federal regulations and the role of HIM regarding payment systems. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in ACC 201, HIF 410, and HIF 420.

HIF 460  Applied Research     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Focuses on applied research in health care services, health informatics, or health information management. Topics include research design, research methods, evaluation and outcomes research, research process, data analysis, and ethical issues in research. Students will analyze published research projects, prepare a research study proposal, and conduct an applied research study. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in HIF 350 and PSY 300.

HIF 465  Professional Management Experience II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: During this supervised professional management experience, students will perform management-level activities at an approved health related facility. The management activities are designed to prepare the student for entry-level management roles in health information management settings. Virtual laboratory and other activities simulating work performed in health-related facilities will also be used in this professional management experience class. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing in the HIM Program.

HIF 470  Senior Seminar     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Course is a student-centered experience where students present and discuss their professional management experience; develop an analysis of their employment readiness; explore employment opportunities and career preparation, and complete a comprehensive exam. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing in the HIM Program.

Physical Education (PED)

PED 100  Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to fields of study in Health and Exercise, Physical Education and Recreation Sport Management. Basic information about the different possible career opportunities as well as professional organization affiliations.

PED 101  Fitness and Wellness     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Develops knowledge and skill in obtaining optimal health fitness through nutrition, stress management, cardiorespiratory endurance, recognition of risk factors for heart disease, and musculoskeletal development. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Students must enroll in the lecture and one of the following seven PED 101 labs: 1) Aquatic Conditioning - Designed to instruct students in a variety of aquatic exercises to develop overall muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness. Swimming skills not needed. 2) General Physical Conditioning - Designed to instruct students in a variety of physical exercise activities to develop overall muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness. 3) Fitness Swimming - Designed to instruct students in a swimming program to develop overall muscular strength and muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness. Must be at Intermediate swimming level and higher. 4) Jogging - Designed to instruct students in a jogging program to develop overall muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness. 5) Rhythmic Aerobics - Designed to instruct students in a variety of choreographed exercise routines to music to develop overall muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness. 6) Strength Training - Designed to instruct students in weight resistant activities to develop overall muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility. 7) Walking for Fitness and Weight Control - Designed to instruct students in a walking exercise program to develop overall muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness.

PED 110  Adaptive Activities     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A program of activities adapted to the needs of the handicapped and physically restricted student. This class may be repeated for credit with permission of the Coordinator of Adaptive Activities. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 111  Beginning Curling     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to the sport of curling, including sport specific skills of delivering the stone, and sweeping as well as cognitive skills of scoring, types of shots, and strategy. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 112  Beginning Racquetball     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A beginner's course of instruction in the basic skills of racquetball, including the techniques of singles and doubles play. Student must furnish racquet and a new can of racquetballs. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 113  Beginning Soccer     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Introduction to the sport of soccer, including sport specific skills, strategies, rules. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 Physical activity course. May be repeated up to 4 times for credit.

PED 116  Beginning Bait and Fly Casting     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to sport fishing. Emphasizes casting skills, methods of fishing, fish habitat, conservation practices, and lure making. Field trip may be required. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 117  Beginning Riflery and Trap Shooting     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Instruction in recreational shooting. Emphasizes firearms safety; rifle and shotgun trap marksmanship, particular stress on range practice; methods and techniques of reloading ammunition and cleaning firearms. Students must provide own ammunition. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 118  Beginning Bowling     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: House fee required. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 119  Beginning Golf     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish four new golf balls. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 120  Beginning Tennis     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish racquet and one can of new tennis balls. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 121  Beginning Badminton     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish three new shuttlecocks. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 122  Beginning Orienteering: Map and Compass     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An exciting new recreational sport which combines use of map and compass with physical activity; combines several styles of orienteering with practice on actual courses. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 123  Beginning Judo     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Student must furnish gi. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 124  Beginning Survival and Primitive Living     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Instruction in preparing for environmental emergencies with emphasis on the psychological aspect of survival situations and establishment of priorities for sustaining life in an environmental emergency. An overnight experience is required. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 127  Beginning Archery     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to target and field archery. Emphasizes shooting technique and various types of archery games and competition. Students must furnish a matched set of six arrows. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 128  Beginning Backpacking     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Instruction in backpacking. Emphasizes equipment orientation, personal conduct within the natural environment, clothing and shelter, preservation of wilderness area integrity, safety, foods, and cooking. Course includes on-the-trail instruction and practicum. All equipment furnished by the department. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 130  Beginning Swimming     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Basic skills in swimming. Swim suit required. Non-swimmers only. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 131  Lifeguard Training     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Provides minimum skills training for a person to qualify to serve as a lifeguard. Prerequisite(s): Be at least 15 years old, able to swim 500 yards continuously using side stroke, front crawl, and breast stroke. Each stroke demonstrated a minimum of 100 yards. Surface dive to 8 - 12 feet and recover a 10-pound brick. Tread water for 2 minutes with arms across chest (legs only). Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 132  Intermediate Swimming     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Development of swimming strokes. Swim suit required. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course. Prerequisite(s): Ability to swim.

PED 135  Skin and Scuba Diving     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Techniques and safety for skin and scuba diving. Swim suit and special fee required. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course. Prerequisite(s): Above-average ability to swim.

PED 137  Water Safety Instructor     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Water safety techniques as prescribed by the American Red Cross; W.S.I. Certification for those who qualify. Swim suit required. Prerequisite(s): Be at least 17 years of age at the end of the course, able to pass the pre-course written test and skills test. The written test is taken from the Community Water Safety and/or Swimming and Diving Text (Chapters 2 and 13). The skills test involves rescue skills and stroke evaluation. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 138  Beginning Canoeing     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Practical instruction in canoeing. Emphasizes safety and techniques. On-the-water experiences are integral with instruction. Students must be able to swim. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 139  Beginning Skiing     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Development of basic skills in downhill (Alpine) and/or cross country skiing. Special fee required. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 140  Beginning Ice Skating     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Special fee required. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 141  Beginning Karate     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish gi. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 142  Hap Ki Do     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A martial art activity with emphasis on self-defense. Students must furnish gi. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 144  Beginning Recreation Games     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Shuffleboard, table tennis, horseshoes, croquet, and others. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 145  Aerobic Dance     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An activity course in which students' cardiovascular endurance is developed through continuous rhythmic exercise and dance set to music. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 146  Beginning Social Dance     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 147  Beginning Ballet     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to ballet with emphasis on developing style, the basics of body alignment, arm placement, footwork and expressiveness. Students must furnish ballet shoes.Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 153  Beginning Modern Dance     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish leotard. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 156  Beginning Tap Dance     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish tap shoes. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 157  Dance Choreography     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Designed to teach principles and fundamental dance skills for use in choreography assignments relating to time, space, energy, group relationships, and performance techniques. The choreography is especially relevant to vocal music, musical theatre, and concert dance. Two hours lab. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 158  Intercollegiate Sports I     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Intercollegiate athletic team members who are on the men's basketball, men's football, women's basketball, women's soccer, women's volleyball teams and cheer squad only. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 159  Intercollegiate Sports II     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Intercollegiate athletic team members who are on the men's baseball, men's cross country, men's golf, men's indoor track, men's outdoor track, women's cross country, women's golf, women's indoor track, women's outdoor track, women's softball or women's tennis teams only. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 160  Dance Participation     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Open to any individual interested in developing higher level skills in dance performance through participation in the Missouri Western State University Dance Company. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course. Prerequisite(s): Consent of dance company sponsor.

PED 171  Beginning Cave Exploring     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to the sport of spelunking. Emphasizes safety aspects and appreciation of cave ecology. Course includes caving trips. Equipment furnished by the department. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 172  Intermediate Cave Exploring     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Continuation of PED 171. Involves intermediate activities in spelunking: reading cave maps, basic vertical techniques, basic rescue techniques, and discussions in cave geology. Course includes caving trips. Most equipment furnished by the department. Special fee required. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course. Prerequisite(s): PED 171.

PED 175  Beginning Volleyball     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 180  Pilates     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A progressive activity where students learn proper body alignment and techniques for integration into movement with emphasis on lower back and abdominal strength. May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 181  Beginning Crossfit     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: This course will teach students the basic Olympic lifts and gymnastic movements of Crossfit. It will teach lifetime fitness through general physical conditioning. May be repeated up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 182  Yoga     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Gaining personal power through the daily use of Kundalini Yoga is an integrated approach offering Kriya (designed physical movements), Pranayama (breathing practices), Dharana (concentration) and Dhyana (meditation) and gong vibration relaxation. The goal of the class is to deepen the qualities of attention and concentration and to increase physical and mental stamina in physical performance and practice settings. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 185  Beginning Weight Training and Conditioning     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 186  Aerobic Fitness     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: May be taken up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 187  Beginning Cycling     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish bicycle. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 188  Wilderness Canoeing     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Comprehensive course in flatwater and river canoeing; emphasizes whitewater paddling technique and personal conduct in wilderness environments; includes wilderness camping skills and expedition dynamics. Class is usually held in Minnesota, South Missouri, or Arkansas. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 189  Beginning Pistol and Skeet     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Pistol and skeet marksmanship, emphasizing range practice; methods and techniques of reloading ammunition and cleaning firearms. Students must provide own ammunition. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 190  Adult Physical Fitness     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An activity course in which student's knowledge of high level wellness is developed through participation in discussion and physical activity programs. Designed as a class for returning students to be taught concurrently with the adult physical fitness class in Continuing Education. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 191  Foundations of Physical Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Historic and philosophic analysis of physical education emphasizing physical education as an academic discipline, professional opportunities, and associated fields. Recommended for freshmen.

PED 192  Independent Physical Activity     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: This course will involve independent physical activity tracking which will be monitored by the instructor. You will be required to purchase a physical activity tracker. May be repeated up to four times for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 193  Special Weight Training Class for Athletes Only     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Limited to members of MWSU Intercollegiate Athletic Teams and Cheer Squad only. May be taken one time only for credit. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 219  Intermediate Golf     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish four new golf balls. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 5 physical activity course. Prerequisite(s): PED 119.

PED 222  Human Sexuality     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Physiological, psychological, sociological, behavioral, and clinical aspects of sexuality. Topics will be addressed over the life span and will include controversial issues.

PED 240  Methods of Teaching Lifetime Activities for Secondary Physical Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Presents Teaching Methodology - develops knowledge and skills in lifetime activities. May require additional off campus meetings for applied teaching experiences.

PED 241  Concepts of Sport Activities     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Presents Teaching Methodology - develops knowledge and skills in the team sports of basketball, flag football, soccer, and volleyball. May require additional off campus meetings for applied teaching experiences.

PED 246  Concepts of Dance and Gymnastics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Presents teaching methodology and develops knowledge and skills in social, folk, and square dance, stunts and tumbling, and apparatus gymnastics. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 250  Intermediate Ice Skating     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Continuation of PED 140. Emphasizes ice skating as a leisure activity for a lifetime. Special fee required. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course.

PED 253  Intermediate Modern Dance     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Students must furnish leotard. Meets General Studies Category 5, Line 2 physical activity course. Prerequisite(s): PED 153.

PED 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Physical Education     Credits: 1-2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research in physical education. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving physical education-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the department.

PED 294  Drug Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course addresses the concepts of drug use, drug misuse and drug abuse as they pertain to prescribed medications as well as illicit substances. Over the counter preparations are included, as well as the more commonly encountered drugs in the school setting.

PED 303  Kinesiology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Analyzes movement through the study of anatomical structures and mechanical principles of the human body; applicable to elementary, secondary, and adult populations. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in BIO 250.

PED 304  Physiology of Exercise     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Basic physiology applied to physical education and the training of athletes; applicable to elementary, secondary, and adult populations. Three hours lecture, one hour lab. Prerequisite(s): BIO 250 with a C or higher.

PED 305  First Aid: Responding to Emergencies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to help sustain life and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until advanced medical care arrives. Participants will be able to identify and eliminate potentially hazardous conditions, recognize emergencies and make appropriate decision for first aid care. Optional Certification in: Adult CPR/AED, Pediatric CPR and First Aid.

PED 306  Sport Safety Training     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to help provide a safe environment for athletes while participating in sports and, in an emergency, to help sustain life and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until advanced medical care arrives. Participants will be able to identify and eliminate potentially hazardous conditions, recognize emergencies and make appropriate decision for first aid care. Optional Certification in: Adult CPR/AED, Pediatric CPR and First Aid.

PED 310  Principles and Administration of Coaching     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Provides insight into the coaching profession; includes developing a professional approach to coaching ethics, psychology of athletics, staff selection, public relations, administration of duties (scheduling, eligibility, reports, purchasing, care of facilities), and appreciation for non-technical aspects of the total job. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

PED 311  Coaching and Officiating of Football     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Theory, fundamentals, and officiating of football; includes team selection, organization, and strategies from the coaching and officiating standpoints. Officiating in intramurals may be required. Two hours lecture, one hour lab. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 312  Coaching and Officiating of Basketball     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Theory, fundamentals, and officiating of basketball; includes team selection, organization, and strategies from the coaching and officiating standpoints. Officiating in Intramurals may be required. Two hours lecture, one hour lab.

PED 313  Coaching and Officiating of Baseball and Softball     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Theory, fundamentals, and officiating of baseball and softball; includes team selection, organization, and strategies from the coaching and officiating standpoints. Officiating in Intramurals may be required. Two hours lecture, one hour lab. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 314  Coaching and Officiating of Track and Field     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Theory, fundamentals, and officiating of track and field; includes team selection, organization, and strategies from the coaching and officiating standpoints. Officiating in Intramurals may be required. Two hours lecture, one hour lab. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 315  Coaching and Officiating of Volleyball     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Theory, fundamentals, and officiating of volleyball; includes team selection, organization, and strategies from the coaching and officiating standpoints. Officiating in Intramurals may be required. Two hours lecture, one hour lab. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 316  Coaching and Officiating of Wresting     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Theory, fundamentals, and officiating in wrestling; includes team selection, organization, and strategies from the coaching and officiating standpoints. Officiating in Intramurals may be required. Two hours lecture, one hour lab. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 317  Principles of Strength Training and Conditioning     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Fundamentals in the development of strength and conditioning programs for a variety of populations. Includes the physiological bases of strength development, identification of specific exercises to develop strength, proper technique, and periodized programming for maximal development. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 318  Principles of Aerobic Training     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Fundamentals in the development of aerobic programs for a variety of populations: includes the physiological bases of aerobic development, identification of specific exercises and activities to develop aerobic power, proper technique, identify contraindicated exercises, and programming for maximal development of aerobic power. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 319  Coaching and Officiating of Soccer     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Theory, fundamentals, and officiating of soccer includes FIFA laws of the Game, skill development, conditioning, strategies, and basic organizational techniques to coach and referee soccer. Two hours lecture, one hour lab. May require additional off-campus meetings.

PED 327  Exercise Prescription for Special Populations     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Provide the students with principles and practice in developing exercise programs specifically designed for special populations. Prerequisite(s): PED 304 or PED 391 with a grade of C or higher.

PED 352  Fitness and Sports Nutrition     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course will provide students with an understanding of the basic nutrition principles to help promote and maintain health throughout a life cycle. Students will examine the relationship between physical activity, proper nutrition, sports performance and overall wellness. Students will learn what foods are needed for healthy lifestyles and peak performance. Students will also learn how proper nutrition maximizes physical performance in exercise and sports contexts. This course strengthens health promotion and disease prevention through increased knowledge of nutrition and physical activity. This class provides information to students in developing healthy lifestyle choices.

PED 370  Methods in Teaching Health and Physical Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Includes health/physical education content at the collegiate level, as well as methods and materials for the school settings. The physical education major will receive health methods K-12 and the elementary classroom majors will receive health and physical education methods K-6. Prerequisite(s): PED 101 and official admittance to the teacher education program.

PED 373  Psychology of Exercise     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course is designed to examine applied and theoretical issues related to the psychology of exercise and physical activity. The course will enable students to use their knowledge of psychological aspects of exercise to facilitate exercise adoption and adherence as well as applying motivational and behavior change strategies when working with others in various health and physical activity settings. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PSY 101.

PED 374  Psychology of Sport     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Emphasizes the psychology and sociology of the sports participant from the standpoint of participant's behavior toward other individuals and groups. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PED 375  Sociocultural Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: To develop an understanding of sport not only from a sociological perspective but also from a social creation standpoint. This course will examine the socially created realities of sport and will provide a critical analysis of sport at all levels (informal and organized youth, interscholastic, intercollegiate, and professional). Emphasis is placed on gender, race, economic, media, and political issues in sport.

PED 380  Rhythms and Creative Movement for Elementary School     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Designed to teach elementary teachers how to approach the use of rhythms as a means for developing neuromuscular growth and body space awareness; uses a variety of musical styles and rhythmic devices to develop a knowledge in movement exploration including body awareness, space utilization, time, and energy change. Students will be required to meet off-campus for teaching experience. Elementary education majors may not take the course until officially admitted to the teacher education program.

PED 381  Outdoor Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A methodology course with an emphasis on establishing learning experiences in natural environments through varied disciplines of study. Two hours lecture, two hours lab.

PED 382  Elementary School Physical Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Fundamental skills, sports, and games for the elementary school physical education program. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. May meet off-campus for micro teaching experiences in an elementary school; may have one teaching experience at night.

PED 383  Adapted Physical Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Theory and methods of programming activities for handicapped students; recognition of, prevention of, and practical experience with structural deviations from normal body mechanics.

PED 385  Athletic Training     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Prevention and care of common athletic injuries, protective equipment, and training methods. Prerequisite(s): BIO 250.

PED 386  Prevention, Intervention and Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course examines the evolution of AIDS and STD's as well as modes of transmission, disease progression, and the risk factors involved in pathogenic exposure. In addition, screening procedures and treatments are addressed. Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 or BIO 105 and junior standing.

PED 387  Current Issues in Health Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course is designed to critically analyze research and literature in health education. The range of topics for discussion will include literature from popular readings to scientific reports from referred journals.

PED 388  Community Health     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course examines the issues and problems that exist within the political, social, cultural and economic dimensions of community health.

PED 391  Personal and Environmental Health     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Summer.

Course Description: This course addresses personal and environmental health issues and concerns as they relate to physiological and psychological well-being. Responsibility and decision making skills pertinent to health behaviors are also included. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PED 101.

PED 392  Child Growth and Motor Development     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The study of humans from conception to maturation dealing with the pattern of growth involved in the physical and mental process. This course will focus on the four domains of growth (Physical (Motor), Cognitive, Social and Emotional) with a specific emphasis on Motor Development / Motor Learning. The main purpose is to develop understanding of experimental and experiential factors concerning developmental factors that affect a person's skills and abilities in all four domains across the lifespan.

PED 393  Measurement in Physical Education     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Methods in evaluation of the product and process; special emphasis on physical fitness, motor ability, posture, and specific sports skills; applicable to elementary, secondary, and adult populations. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in MAT 110 or MAT 110E or higher.

PED 395  Intramural Management     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Organization and administration of intramural and extramural activities. Assistance in the intramural program is required. One hour lecture, two hours lab.

PED 400  Advanced Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of cardiovascular physiology with an emphasis on normal versus abnormal function. It provides an in depth study of the cardiovascular system and its various responses to acute and chronic exercise. Prerequisite(s): PED 304 with a grade of C or higher.

PED 401  Graded Exercise Testing     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Examines the principles of exercise testing, the methods of conducting a graded exercise test, collection and calculation of test data in a sequential manner and interpretation of information so obtained. Offers a basic understanding of the normal physiological adaptations to chronic exercise and the electrophysiology of electrocardiography. Three hours lecture, one hour lab. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PED 304.

PED 417  Applied Techniques in Personal Training     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with practical experience working with clients (faculty/staff/students) in a supervised setting enabling them to become more confident and competent in carrying out exercise assessments and writing appropriate prescriptions for individuals. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PED 304, PED 317 and PED 401.

PED 420  Senior Seminar in Physical Education     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Practical preparation for the profession including job seeking techniques, resume and portfolio building, interviewing techniques, professional organizations and membership benefits, and visits from professionals in the field. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and a grade of C or higher in all PED courses required in the major or concurrent enrollment.

PED 430  Field Experience in Health and Exercise Science     Credits: 9

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: A 400 hour internship with an agency related to Health and Exercise Science to develop and utilize skills learned in the classroom. Agency selected by the student with instructor approval. Prerequisite(s): Senior status; a grade C or higher in all PED courses in the core including PED 401; completion of all departmental application requirements; and agency acceptance of the intern.

PED 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Completion of the major-minor declaration in physical education, a minimum of a 2.5 GPA in the major field, and/or departmental approval.

PED 451  Research in Health and Exercise Science     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Original research in areas related to Health or Exercise Science. Students will be guided in the development of research ideas and problem statements, literature reviews, testing methodology, data collection, and interpretation of results. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, and a grade of C or higher in PED 393.

PED 480  Practicum in Physical Education     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Individualized in-depth study of a subject in which the student is particularly interested. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.

PED 481  Children's Lifetime Sports Academy Practicum     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Summer.

Course Description: Practical teaching experience of children aged eight to15 in lifetime sports and adventure activities. Can be repeated for credit.

PED 485  Athletic Training II     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Methods of athletic injury mechanisms and evaluative techniques of athletic injuries. Knowledge and understanding of modalities, therapeutic techniques, and rehabilitation programs of athletic injuries. One hour lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PED 385.

Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) 

PTA 100  Introduction to Physical Therapy     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall Summer.

Course Description: Introduction to physical therapy and to the role of the physical therapist assistant, including function of the PTA and of the health care team, history of medical care and physical therapy, legal and ethical standards, cultural sensitive care and communication.

PTA 110  Patient Care Skills     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Introduction to basic clinical skills, progressing from bedside management to community mobility. Includes vital signs, aseptic technique, patient transfers and gait training. Health and safety issues, including universal (standard) precautions, electrical and hospital safety, and emergency and first aid procedures. Introduction to documentation. To be taken concurrently with PTA 120 and PTA 130. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the PTA program.

PTA 120  Modalities     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Clinical modality interventions, including thermal modalities, electrical modalities, hydrotherapy and compressive modalities. Soft tissue interventions for patients with edema, wounds, burns, and vascular pathologies. To be taken concurrently with PTA 110 and PTA 130. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the PTA program.

PTA 130  Functional Anatomy     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Introduction to principles of physics as they relate to movement, including levers and force vectors. Surface anatomy, introduction to musculoskeletal structure and function. Introduction to medical terminology. To be taken concurrently with PTA 110 and PTA 120. Prerequisite(s): Admission into the PTA program.

PTA 140  Measurements and Procedures     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Methods of data collection including joint range of motion (goniometry), manual muscle testing, anthropometric measurement, and gait analysis. Review and continuation of physical therapy documentation. To be taken concurrently with PTA 160 and PTA 165. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 100, PTA 110, PTA 120, and PTA 130.

PTA 160  Clinical Kinesiology     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The study of the muscular forces acting on anatomical structures to create movement, including normal and pathological biomechanics. To be taken concurrently with PTA 140 and PTA 165. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 100, PTA 110, PTA 120 and PTA 130.

PTA 165  Therapeutic Exercise     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Study of the physiological effect of basic and advanced exercises commonly used in physical therapy, including ROM and stretching, strengthening, aerobic exercise, balance and coordination exercises, proprioceptive exercise, endurance training and aquatic exercise. Common therapeutic exercise protocols used in physical therapy will be presented. Concepts include exercise progression and documentation of exercise as a therapeutic intervention. To be taken concurrently with PTA 140 and PTA 160. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 100, PTA 110, PTA 120 and PTA 130.

PTA 185  Clinical Education I     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Summer.

Course Description: First of three practicums in a physical therapy setting. Areas of emphasis include PTA relationships with patients and staff, clinic organization, beginning awareness of patient disorders, initial application of physical therapy techniques, and introduction to documentation. Three weeks of full-time supervised clinical practice. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 140, PTA 160 and PTA 165.

PTA 255  Clinical Orthopedics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Description, causes, symptoms, tests and physical therapy intervention in orthopedic pathology. The musculoskeletal system and normal biomechanics are reviewed. To be taken concurrently with PTA 260. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 185.

PTA 260  Clinical Neurology     Credits: 4

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Neuroanatomy and how damage to this body system is managed by physical therapy intervention. To be taken concurrently with PTA 255. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 185.

PTA 265  Diseases and Dysfunctions     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Diseases and dysfunction encountered in physical therapy across the lifespan, including disorders of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, genitourinary, and endocrine systems. Includes pregnancy, arthritis and cancerous conditions. To be taken concurrently with PTA 270 and PTA 280. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 255 and PTA 260.

PTA 270  Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Therapy     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Psychosocial issues in health care as related to physical therapy. To be taken concurrently with PTA 265 and PTA 280. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 255 and PTA 260.

PTA 280  Clinical Rehabilitation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Physical therapy rehabilitation principles for patients following amputation, total joint surgery, fractures, and spinal cord injury. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation in rehabilitation. Physical therapy interventions with chronic illness, the elderly, and dying patients. To be taken concurrently with PTA 265 and PTA 270. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 255 and PTA 260.

PTA 285  Clinical Education II     Credits: 5

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Second of three clinical practicums. Application of physical therapy procedures, appropriate professional behavior and communication. Participation in physical therapy clinic activities in addition to patient care. Six weeks of full-time supervised clinical practice. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 265, PTA 270 and PTA 280.

PTA 290  Clinical Education III     Credits: 5

Typically Offered: Summer.

Course Description: Third of three clinical practicums. Physical therapy principles and practice with emphasis on achievement of integration, application, communication, and participation at levels consistent with a beginning PTA practitioner. Six weeks of full-time supervised clinical practice. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 265, PTA 270, and PTA 280.

PTA 295  Clinical Seminar     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Summer.

Course Description: Review and evaluation of clinical affiliation experiences, board exam preparation, resume writing and interview skills. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in PTA 265, PTA 270 and PTA 280.

Recreation Sport Management (RSM)

RSM 220  Introduction to Recreation and Sport Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: History and foundations of organized recreation including objectives, responsibilities, scope, and economic and social aspects; tours of specific recreation agencies.

RSM 230  Recreation/Sport Field Experience I     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Practical, exploratory view of three recreation and sport agencies from an on-the-job perspective. One hour lecture, five hours lab. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in RSM 220.

RSM 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Recreational Sport Management     Credits: 1-2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research in recreation or sport management. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving recreation or sport management-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the department.

RSM 300  Philosophy and Leadership in Recreation and Sport Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Analyzes fundamental philosophical concepts and the influence on personal leadership and management techniques as they relate to working with people and leisure organizations.

RSM 320  Foundations of Esports     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to explore the history and foundations of esport, and the current state of the industry. Students will examine the role of various stakeholders (e.g., game developers, tournament organizers, coaches, players, and governing bodies) in the provision of esport, and will examine various career paths within the industry.

RSM 322  Social Recreation     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Principles and techniques of administering and conducting social events; emphasizes planning, discussion, demonstration, and participation.

RSM 323  Programming and Event Planning in Recreation and Sport     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Basic principles and practices in planning recreation and sport programs in a variety of settings. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in RSM 220.

RSM 325  Law for the Recreation and Sport Practitioner     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: This course is designed to learn procedures that will aid them in risk management planning to reduce the incidence of injuries/lawsuits. Students will learn how to apply an understanding of local, state, and federal law and regulations to recreation and sport settings.

RSM 326  Recreational Arts, Crafts, and Music     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Surveys various arts, crafts, and music involved in recreation settings. Students must furnish their own supplies. One hour lecture, two hours lab.

RSM 330  Recreation/Sport Field Experience II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Supervised leadership assignment in a recreation or sport agency leading to a deeper conceptual view of intended professional aspirations. One hour lecture, eight hours lab. Prerequisite(s): Completed major-minor declaration in recreation sport management program, a grade of C or higher in RSM 230, minimum overall GPA of 2.2, and 20 supplemental preparation hours.

RSM 335  Instructor of Initiatives     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course is designed to provide the student with the many aspects of being an instructor of initiative activities. The course will also provide the student with knowledge of how to build and construct different types of initiative and safety concerns.

RSM 340  Interpretive Services in Parks and Recreation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Designed to apply a comprehensive interpretive program in parks and recreation. Development of an understanding of the principles and practices of stewardship and use of natural resources and the ability to interpret them to the general public, particularly as related to the public's role in stewardship. Application of the principles and practices basic to the effective management of recreation users in natural resources settings will be stressed.

RSM 342  Facility Management in Recreation and Sport     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Designed to provide a variety of theoretical and applied learning experiences to develop an understanding of the principles and procedures for planning, designing, developing and evaluating recreation and sport facilities. Understanding the ability to promote, advocate, interpret, and articulate the concerns of recreation and sport systems for all populations and services.

RSM 343  Marketing in Recreation and Sport     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Defines and analyzes the fundamentals of marketing in the sport and recreation fields. Emphasis is placed on the development of a marketing plan and a sponsorship proposal.

RSM 344  Travel and Tourism Development in Recreation and Sport     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Understanding the role of travel, tourism, and sport tourism and its economic and cultural impacts on American society. Implications of travel and tourism for programming and entrepreneurship. Emphasis will be placed on economic impact and sustainability.

RSM 360  Entrepreneurship in Recreation and Sport     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Basic steps of initiating and conducting a commercial recreation or sport related enterprise; designed to offer students the knowledge, skills, and understanding necessary to start a business.

RSM 365  Introduction to Special Populations     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Leisure needs and methods of serving various groups in a society; populations include the aged, the ill, the disabled, the disadvantaged, and those in penal institutions.

RSM 420  Seminar in Recreation and Sport Management     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Practical preparation for the profession including job-finding skills, interview techniques, values of recreation association, and visits from field professionals. Prerequisite(s): Completed major-minor declaration in recreation sport management program, senior standing, and a grade of C or higher in all RSM core courses (except RSM 430).

RSM 424  Organization and Administration of Recreation and Sport Agencies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The internal operation of leisure organizations including staffing, finance, public relations, areas and facilities, decision making, and problem solving. Prerequisite(s): Completed major-minor declaration in recreation sport management program, senior standing, and a grade of C or higher in RSM 220, RSM 300, RSM 323, and RSM 325.

RSM 425  Current Issues in Esports, Media, and Society     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to examine current issues in esport, media, and society. Students will explore current issues and controversies in esport and critically analyze the current status of the industry. Students will examine player and spectator motivations and experiences. The course will also view esport from the standpoint of various critical perspectives, both on its own and as sited within the larger context of sport in society. Prerequisite(s): RSM 320.

RSM 428  Introduction to Sport Governance     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course is to assist each student in defining and analyzing issues of governance in the world of sport. It will provide students with an up-to-date understanding of sport governance as they are currently being applied in various sport management contexts.

RSM 430  Recreation/Sport Field Experience III     Credits: 9

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Full-time internship with a recreation or sport agency to develop and utilize skills learned in the classroom.

RSM 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Completion of the major-minor declaration in recreation, a minimum of a 2.5 GPA in the major field, and/or department approval.

RSM 480  Practicum in Recreation and Sport     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: An individualized in-depth study of a subject in which the student is particularly interested. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing and consent of department chairperson.

RSM 481  Esport Academy     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Summer.

Course Description: The students will acquire hands-on leadership experience while running an esport camp for youth.

Social Work (SWK)

SWK 250  Introduction to Social Work     Credits: 4

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Overview of professional social work practice including its history, philosophy, ethics, values, methods, and fields of practice. Forty hours of volunteer experience in an area human service agency required.

SWK 260  Introduction to Aging Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Overview of the physical, social, psychological, cultural, and economic aspects of aging, all from a social problems perspective; social policy and social work intervention issues pertaining to aging.

SWK 270  Selected Topics in Social Work     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Study of a selected problem in social work practice, e.g., mental illness, chemical dependence, or child welfare. Course may be repeated for credit for each different topic.

SWK 280  Mental Health and Social Work     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course provides students with the opportunity to learn content specific to social work practice in the field of mental health at the baccalaureate level. The course will focus on addressing relevant historical components of mental health delivery systems and current policy issues. The course will specifically focus on diagnostic criteria for mental health disorders with a particular focus on promoting a strengths-based and person-centered model of assessment and preliminary intervention.

SWK 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Social Work     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research methods in social work. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving social work-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Consent of department.

SWK 320  Philosophy and Policy in Social Services I     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Historical significance of social legislation, its impact on the individual and society; social philosophy, social service, and social change. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in SWK 250, PSC 101, and either ECO 101 or ECO 260.

SWK 325  Family and Child Welfare     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course examines the field of family and child welfare. Students will explore the history of child welfare, the critical issues facing families and children in our society, the scope of family and child welfare services, and the social, political, legal and economic forces that shape family and children programs. Students will study families from a strengths-based, ecological perspective and will build sensitivity to various family forms, cultural patterns and issues that stem from social and/or economic injustice. Prerequisite(s): ENG 108.

SWK 330  Human Behavior and the Social Environment I     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social-spiritual-cultural behavior within a systems framework, with an emphasis on individuals and families. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, a grade of C or higher in SWK 250, and BIO 101, or departmental approval.

SWK 340  Human Behavior and the Social Environment II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social-spiritual-cultural behavior within a systems framework with a focus on groups, communities, organizations, and institutions. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in SWK 330.

SWK 345  Substance Use and Disorders     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Provides an overview of the substance abuse and dependence field within a bio-psycho-social framework. The course will cover current and historical patterns of drug use; etiological theories and connected research; substance abuse effects on individuals, families, and society; physiological, psychosocial, and cultural aspects of psychoactive substances; basic pharmacology of alcohol and other abused substances; socio-cultural values and their implications for public policy and prevention; assessment and diagnosis of substance abuse/dependence disorders; substance abuse and dependence in special populations, overview of the treatment process and service delivery systems; the recovery process, relapse and relapse prevention and the impact of substance abuse and recovery on family systems. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 or SOC 110.

SWK 350  Social Work Practice I     Credits: 4

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Introduces generalist social work practice with individuals and families. Covers the nature of social work practice, practice theory, ethics and values, the social work relationship, interviewing, the problem-solving process, assessment, planning, intervention, and practice evaluation. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, a grade of C or higher in SWK 250, and a grade of C or higher or concurrent enrollment in SWK 330.

SWK 360  Social Work Practice II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Continuation of SWK 350. Focuses on group work within the generalist social work perspective. Covers group theory, ethics and values, problem-solving process, assessment, planning, intervention, and practice evaluation applied to task and treatment groups. Prerequisite(s): Declared Social Work major, SWK 330, credit or concurrent enrollment in SWK 340 and a grade of C or higher in SWK 350.

SWK 365  Death And Dying     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Cultural views and customs regarding death and dying; stages of death and dying; abnormal grief reactions, issues pertaining to children and death, role of spirituality; functions of health care systems and interdisciplinary teams.

SWK 415  Social Work Practice III     Credits: 4

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Continuation of SWK 350 and SWK 360. Applies the planned change process to interventions with organizations, communities and institutions within the generalist social work perspective. Students complete a community development/organizing project in a local community. Prerequisite(s): Declared social work major and a grade of C or higher in both SWK 340 and SWK 360.

SWK 420  Philosophy and Policy in Social Services II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Continuation of SWK 320. Analyzes the philosophy and policies of presently active social agencies; policy reforms and evaluation of their possible effectiveness. Prerequisite(s): Declared social work major and a grade of C or higher in SWK 320.

SWK 425  Bridge to Practicum     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course is designed to prepare students for entry into the field practicum. Students will explore field placement options and complete the field application and interview process. In addition, students will develop skills that will bridge them into the professional arena such as resume building, job interviewing and networking skills.

SWK 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Declared social work or interdisciplinary studies major and departmental approval.

SWK 465  Advanced Research Project     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Students will design and conduct an empirical research project focused on a relevant social issue or concern. Same as SOC 465. Prerequisite(s): Any statistics course and a grade of C or higher in SOC 460.

SWK 470  Program Evaluation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Techniques and methods of program evaluation and grant writing, utilize different approaches and methodology to critically examine program goals, outcomes and measures in program evaluation and grant writing. Prerequisite(s): Completion of a research methods course (LAW 325 or SOC 460) and a statistics course or by departmental approval. This course is open to all majors and disciplines.

SWK 480  Practicum in Social Work     Credits: 10

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Students spend a minimum of 456 hours in an agency setting under the supervision of trained social work professionals. To be taken concurrently with SWK 485. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite(s): Formal acceptance into the social work practicum program, a minimum of 2.5 overall GPA and a grade of C or better in SWK 250, SWK 320, SWK 330, SWK 340, SWK 350, SWK 360, SWK 415 and SWK 420, and a grade of C or higher in all other SWK courses.

SWK 485  Social Work Practicum Seminar     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Focuses on the development and enhancement of the student's practice skills and the integration of practicum and class content. Taken concurrently with SWK 480. Prerequisite(s): Declared social work major, formal acceptance into the Practicum Program; a minimum of 2.5 GPA, a grade of C or higher in SWK 250, SWK 320, SWK 330, SWK 340, SWK 350, SWK 360, SWK 415 and SWK 420, and a grade of C or higher in all other SWK courses.

Hong Choi (2007) Professor, Recreation Sport Management. B.A., Yon Sei University; M.S., United States Sports Academy; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

Pamela Clary (2007) Associate Professor, Social Work. A.A., Highland Community College; B.S., Kansas State University; M.S.W., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Regan Dodd (2012) Chairperson, Associate Professor, Physical Education. B.S., M.S.E., Northwest Missouri State University; M.B.A., Baker University; Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Grey Endres (2017) Assistant Professor, Social Work. B.S.E., University of Kansas; M.S.W., University of Kansas; D.S.W., University of Southern California.

Kelly Fast (2014) Associate Professor, Health Information Management. B.S.B.A., Quincy University; M.S., College of St. Scholastica.

Jana Frye (2014) Associate Professor, Social Work. B.S., Truman State University; M.S.W., University of Kansas.

Stephanie Gerlach (2019) Assistant Professor, Exercise Science. B.S., Johann-Wolfgang Goethe University; Bachelor of Sport and Exercise, Massey University; M.S., Minnesota State University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico.

Maureen Holtz (2019) Assistant Professor, Physical Therapist Assistant Program. B.H.S., D.P.T., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Britton Johnson (2009) Professor, Physical Education. B.S., Albion College; M.A., Western Michigan University; Ph.D., Walden University.

Justin Kraft (2007) Professor, Physical Education. B.S., Jamestown College; M.A., University of Northern Colorado; Ph.D., University of Alabama.

Kenneth Kriewitz (2002) Advanced Instructor, Physical Education. B.S., M.S., Central Missouri State University.

Mechel McKinney (2019) Assistant Professor, Health Information Management. A.A.S, University of New Mexico. B.B.A.., University of Phoenix. M.B.A., American Public University.

Maureen Raffensperger (1997) Professor, Physical Therapist Assistant Program. B.S., University of Nebraska Medical Center; M.S., University of Missouri-Columbia; DPT, Des Moines University.

Karman Romero (2017) Assistant Professor, Health Information Management. B.S.N., University of Utah; Ph.D., University of Kansas.

William Russell (2005) Professor, Physical Education. B.A., Cleveland State University; M.S., Ball State University; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Fiona Sansone (2016) Director for Center of Excellence in Applied Healthcare Learning & Assistant Professor, Nursing. B.S.N., Missouri Western State University; M.S.W., University of Missouri.