Department of Criminal Justice, Legal Studies & Social Work

Greg Lindsteadt, Ph.D., Chairperson
glindsteadt@missouriwestern.edu
(816) 271-4467
www.missouriwestern.edu/CJ_LS

The Department of Criminal Justice, Legal Studies and Social Work offers students the option of studying in three separate degree programs: Criminal Justice, Legal Studies and Social Work.

Students interested in the area of law enforcement, corrections, juvenile justice and criminal justice administration may pursue one of two degree options available in the criminal justice program:

  1. An associate of science degree with a major in Criminal Justice or;
  2. A bachelor of science degree with a major in Criminal Justice with a concentration in administration, law enforcement, juvenile justice, corrections, or legal studies.

Students interested in working in the legal profession may major in the legal assistant program. Missouri Western’s Legal Assistant Program is a voting member of the American Association for Paralegal Education. In addition, the program is approved by the American Bar Association. In the program, students may pursue a course of study leading to an associate of science degree with a major in Legal Assistant, a certificate, or a B.S. Degree in Criminal Justice with a concentration in legal studies.

Social work is a profession for those with a strong desire to work with people. Social workers assist individuals, families, groups, organizations or communities to enhance or restore their capacity for social functioning and work to create the societal conditions necessary for people to flourish. Social workers are employed in both public and private human service agencies as well as in private corporations and often work directly with people by linking them with needed resources, providing counseling, and/or advocating for needed services. Social workers also work behind the scenes by developing needed human service programs or by shaping the social welfare policies that guide human services.

The Department offers a Graduate Certificate and a Masters of Applied Science in Forensic Investigations. The Certificate and M.A.S. are designed to provide individuals the opportunity to receive instructions from eminent forensic scientists and other distinguished professionals as well as department faculty. Several forensic investigation courses are available to undergraduates as well. These courses and degrees are of particular interest to professionals and students interested in a career in crime scene investigation. For more information contact your advisor, the department, or go to our graduate website at www.missouriwestern.edu/cj-ls-swk/fi.

Criminal Justice and Legal Studies

The criminal justice program seeks to prepare the student for entry into or advancement within the criminal justice system in any of the many areas existing within the career field or for graduate studies in a related field. Such areas include:

  • Juvenile justice agencies: Most juvenile justice agencies presently require a degree in a related area.
  • Investigative agencies: Federal, state, county and local agencies, including private investigative agencies.
  • Conservation agencies: These agencies enforce wildlife regulations.
  • Correctional agencies: Institutions and probation/parole systems within federal, state and county governmental levels.
  • Industrial security: Corporate interests nationwide.
  • Legal profession: Corporate, private, government agency, and public interest law offices.

Admission Requirements

Students who want to major in criminal justice should declare their interest to the Department of Criminal Justice, Legal Studies and Social Work, so that they may be assigned an advisor within the department. Applications for the B.S. degree in Criminal Justice will be reviewed upon submission to their advisor. The faculty advisor will review the student's eligibility to file a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice with their chosen concentration. A student must either have an ACT composite score of 18 or higher OR have completed an A.A. degree or an A.S./A.A. degree prior to admission into the B.S. program for Criminal Justice. A student must also have earned an overall grade point average of 2.0 or higher to be admitted and allowed to file a major declaration form for the B.S. program.

Students with an ACT composite score below 18 who have not completed an A.A. or A.S. degree may seek admission upon demonstration of their likelihood of success in a B.S. degree. These students must have an overall grade point average of 2.0 or higher. In addition, students must have successfully completed at least five classes in the intended criminal justice major, with at least a 2.50 GPA composite in the five courses. Approval of the department chair is required.

If the student meets the criteria, the advisor will sign both the application and major declaration form and then forward them to the chairperson for review. The major declaration form can then be filed with the Registrar. If admission requirements are not met for the B.S. degree in Criminal Justice, the student will be encouraged to declare a major in the A.S. degree in Criminal Justice or Legal Assistant, working towards admission requirements for the B.S. degree in Criminal Justice.

Legal Studies

The Legal Studies Program offers a course of study designed to prepare the individual to work in the new and evolving paralegal profession. A student in this program will be taught the skills needed to obtain an entry level position as a legal assistant. The skills the student will learn include legal research, interviewing, investigation, legal drafting, preparation of evidence and witnesses for trial, and assisting in the trial of a lawsuit.

This program prepares individuals for career opportunities in small law firms, large law firms of fifty attorneys or more, legal departments of banks, insurance companies, land title insurance companies and other corporations, legal aid offices, public defender offices, the office of the prosecuting attorney, and municipal legal departments.

Paralegals cannot practice law. Only attorneys, who are licensed in the state by the Supreme Court, can practice law.

To graduate from the program students must:

  • Satisfactorily complete all courses required in the program;
  • Perform legal research and analysis by using legal research material;
  • Draft and prepare legal documents;
  • Identify and explain the various functions performed by a legal assistant;
  • Explain the role of the legal assistant working in a law office;
  • Identify ethical issues, rules and standards that a legal assistant must follow when working under an attorney's supervision (a legal assistant's conduct is expected to conform to these ethical standards);
  • Perform the functions of a legal assistant under the supervision of a practicing attorney.

Legal Assistant Certificate

The specialized Legal Assistant Certificate program enables students to focus on the technical, legal  specialty courses that will enable them to work as legal assistants. The program is designed for the student who has already earned a substantial number of college credits, or even a college degree, and by reason of education and experience, only needs selected courses to round out her/his education.

Entrance Requirements

Students must have earned at least 30 college credits prior to enrolling in the program. Eighteen of these hours must be general education elective credits. General education is defined as post-secondary courses in the following areas:

  1. language and composition,
  2. mathematics,
  3. social and behavioral sciences,
  4. physical and biological sciences, and
  5. theater and humanities.

This must include ENG 104 College Writing and Rhetoric and ENG 108 College Writing and Research (or their equivalents or otherwise demonstrate a proficiency in English).

The Gainful Employment Disclosure for this program may be found online at www.missouriwestern.edu/finaid/gainful-employment-disclosures.

Social Work

The principal educational objective of the social work major is to prepare graduates for beginning generalist social work practice with individuals, groups, families, organizations, communities, and institutions. Students will gain knowledge and skills in the areas of values and ethics, diversity, social and economic justice, populations-at-risk, human behavior and the social  environment, social welfare policy and services, social work practice, and research. The program culminates in a semester-length, supervised practicum that allows students to function as student social workers in an area human service agency. The social work program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Admission to the Bachelor of Social Work Program

The social work program operates under a selective admissions policy. Students are considered "pre-majors" until they meet the minimum requirements to be accepted as a social work major. Admission to the social work program involves the completion of an application packet. Minimum requirements for admission into the social work major include:

  • Completion of the general studies math requirement;
  • Completion of the ENG 108 College Writing and Research general studies requirement;
  • Completion of BIO 101 Principles of Biology (or equivalent);
  • Completion of REL 250 Religions of East Asia and Oceania, REL 251 Religions of the West or REL 252 Religions of South Asia and Africa; and
  • Completion of SWK 250 Introduction to Social Work, SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology, PSY 101 General Psychology, and ENG 108 College Writing and Research with a minimum grade of C in each course
  • Must have a minimum overall GPA of 2.5;
  • Must have earned a C or higher in all completed SWK prefix classes;
  • Must agree to and conduct themselves in a manner consistent with accepted professional social work practices and the current NASW Code of Ethics (see Social Work Student Handbook);
  • Cannot have exhibited behavior that will infringe on their present or future ability to adequately fulfill professional social work responsibilities. The social work program's admissions committee reserves the right to require applicants to submit additional materials if the Committee questions the student's ability to adequately fulfill professional responsibilities (see Social Work Student Handbook);

Students must complete the social work admission process prior to enrolling in SWK 360 Social Work Practice II and must submit completed application packets no later than the first Friday in October or March. The social work program's admissions committee will review all application packets and interview all applicants. Admission decisions are based on a student's academic performance; professional, personal, and academic conduct; references; and responses to application and interview questions.

Social work majors must successfully complete a second formal application process before entering SWK 480 Practicum in Social Work and SWK 485 Social Work Practicum Seminar.  To be eligible to enroll in SWK 480 Practicum in Social Work and SWK 485 Social Work Practicum Seminar, students must have earned a minimum grade of C in all completed SWK prefix courses and carry a minimum overall GPA of 2.5. Students applying to enter the social work practicum must submit an application and practicum essay (outline available from the Field Practicum Coordinator), and complete interviews with the Field Coordinator and prospective field instructors (agency social workers). Practicum planning regularly begins one or two semesters prior to entering the practicum. While every effort is made to identify those students ready for field practicum, it is the student's responsibility to notify the Field Practicum Coordinator of his/her intent to apply to the social work practicum. In accordance with Council of Social Work Education standards, MWSU does not grant academic credit, course waivers, or field practicum credit for previous life or work experiences.

Once admitted to the social work program, social work majors are expected to maintain professional and academic standards of conduct. The social work program at Missouri Western reserves the right to place a student on probationary status or remove a student from the major because of violations of these standards (see Social Work Student Handbook).

The Social Work Program's Mission Statement

The social work program's mission is to prepare undergraduate students for ethical and effective generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and society in Northwest Missouri, and surrounding areas. Social work graduates will value human dignity, social and economic justice, and human and cultural diversity. They will competently serve individuals from diverse backgrounds including persons who are poor, vulnerable, and oppressed and work to reduce poverty, oppression, and discrimination by making government and social services agencies more just and responsible to consumer needs. In addition to preparing competent social workers, MWSU's social work program is dedicated to offering its professional expertise and academic resources to support the community in efforts devoted to enhancing human well-being and social economic justice.

Criminal Justice (LAW)

LAW 100  Introduction to Criminal Justice     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: A survey of the philosophical and historical background of the criminal justice system as it relates to the individual; reviews the principles underlying social organization control devices with an emphasis upon such legal systems as the criminal courts, corrections, and law enforcement; designed to provide general knowledge about the concept and causes of crime, the varying goals and objectives of the criminal justice system, and an assessment of specific role performance of various members of the criminal justice system including major aspects of civil process.

LAW 110  Introduction to Juvenile Justice     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Studies the delinquent juvenile as an individual and the impact on society; investigates delinquency, causation, the role of the law enforcement officer, the juvenile officer, the juvenile court, and juvenile corrections.

LAW 130  Modern Police Procedures     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Examines issues critical to the policing of today's society. Although the primary focus will be on problems faced by street officers, the philosophical concepts will be of concern to anyone in the criminal justice system.

LAW 140  Traffic Control and Accident Investigation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Introduction to traffic control and accident investigation in modern cities; reviews principles of organizing and administering police units for traffic enforcement, accident prevention, and safety education; presents basic techniques of accident investigation, analysis, and interpretation.

LAW 190  Criminal Investigation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: A course on modern investigative methodology. All aspects of the criminal investigative function of the police are fully covered from the preliminary investigation to the preparation of the case for review by the prosecutor. Particular attention is given to the importance of information, interrogation, and instrumentation in the solution and preparation of criminal cases for trial. Prerequisite(s): LAT 101 or LAW 100.

LAW 200  Penology and Corrections     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The origins and theories of punishment and the prison system; introduces principles and programs of institutional correction and special problems in administration; reviews modern recommendations for improvement of the system. Prerequisite(s): LAW 100.

LAW 260  Criminal Law     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Explores the origin, development, and classification of substantive criminal law; reviews the rules of evidence of particular importance at the operational level of law enforcement and criminal procedures in arrest, force, search, and seizure. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 9 credit hours in criminal justice or legal studies.

LAW 270  Probation and Parole     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Examines probation, parole and alternatives to confinement and their effectiveness in curbing future criminal behavior. Prerequisite(s): LAW 100.

LAW 275  Police Photography     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: To introduce students to the principles and practices of police photography. They will learn the legal issues for the development of evidence and the way photography is used in the field of criminal justice. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 6 credit hours in criminal justice or legal studies or permission of the instructor.

LAW 280  Criminalistics     Credits: 5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Introductory survey of modern methodology for police laboratories and introduces the means of achieving high degrees of proficiency in the field of scientific criminal inquiries with the use of laboratory equipment. This will allow the student the opportunity to have actual experience in utilizing the techniques performed in the forensic laboratory. Prerequisite(s): LAW 190.

LAW 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Criminal Justice/Legal Studies     Credits: 1-2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research in criminal justice or legal studies. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving criminal justice or legal studies-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval.

LAW 300  Criminal Justice Communications     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The study of interviewing and interrogation as an oral form of communication; the legal guidelines, and the techniques used in the field of criminal justice. The development of technical writing skills to transfer oral communications into written materials, in the form of narrative reports to be used in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 and COM 104.

LAW 305  Introduction to Theories of Crime     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Provides an introduction to the study of crime and causation of crime from the interdisciplinary perspectives of sociology, psychology, and biology. This course is primarily concerned with understanding the causes of crime and examining some of the most influential explanations for criminal behavior. Also, this course examines various categories of crimes such as (1) violent crimes, (2) property crimes, (3) white collar and organized crimes, (4) public order crimes and (5) cyber crimes and technologies. Prerequisite(s): 9 hours in criminal justice or permission of course instructor.

LAW 315  Criminal Justice Concepts and Issues     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Gives students an opportunity to investigate selected problems or topics on a group discussion basis. Provides materials which reflect prevailing trends and fundamental concepts in criminal justice. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 9 credit hours in criminal justice or legal studies and LAW 305.

LAW 320  Criminal Evidence     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Comprehensive study of evidentiary rules and procedures that apply to the enforcement of criminal law and to the stages of investigation and trial. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 9 credit hours in criminal justice or legal studies.

LAW 325  Understanding Research in Criminal Justice     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An introduction to qualitative and quantitative criminal justice research method theory and techniques. In addition, this course will examine ethics, academic writing and the components of a research study. The student will also be responsible for the building and general interpretation of a database. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 9 credit hours in criminal justice, legal studies or social work and successful completion of the general studies math requirement, or permission of instructor. MAT 112 is recommended, but not required.

LAW 365  Practicum I     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An applied learning experience designed to provide students with a practical experience that is supervised in a criminal justice or legal agency, monitored by the instructor. The student will be required to work at least 135 hours in the field. The experience in the field must be combined with further study of one aspect of the placement agency, which the student must research and write about in a term paper due at the end of the semester. Students who use this course for part of the Applied Learning requirement must further develop this paper and a presentation in LAW 470 that is based on the student's work in LAW 365. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): Declared criminal justice or legal studies major and completion of 9 credit hours in criminal justice or legal studies.

LAW 392  Selected Criminal Justice Topics     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Provides students with the opportunity to examine specialized or advanced topics in criminal justice. Topics will be offered on a rotating basis. These topics will usually be an in-depth examination of a subject introduced in other LAW courses. There may be an applied learning experience with this course, such as a trip or other related activity.

LAW 405  Research Methods     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Provides the student an understanding of the practical usage of key methods of research and statistical evaluation in criminal justice and law. Methods will be demonstrated via classroom application and academic journal articles. The student will develop a research proposal in an area of his or her particular interest during this course. Prerequisite(s): LAW 325 and successful completion of general studies math requirement or permission of course instructor.

LAW 410  Intermediate Criminal Law     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Explores criminal law and examines court decisions as they pertain to functional law enforcement procedures. Prepares the individual to maintain professional skill levels in this area over an extended period of time. Prerequisite(s): LAW 260.

LAW 420  Quantitative Analysis in Criminal Justice     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Quantitative analysis bridges the gap between evaluation and policy implication by providing the student experience utilizing, interpreting, and presenting statistics and statistical models. A key component of this course will be examining restrictions on data and matching the appropriate statistical technique to the data source. Prerequisite(s): Completion of LAW 405 or permission of course instructor.

LAW 440  Juvenile Law and Procedures     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The jurisdiction of juvenile courts; their function and organization; processing the detention of juveniles; case disposition; juvenile statutes; and court procedures. Prerequisite(s): LAW 110.

LAW 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-6

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Declared criminal justice major, a minimum of 2.5 GPA in major field, and departmental approval.

LAW 460  Administration and Planning     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An overview of administration and management in criminal justice organizations. This course utilizes both historical and current organizational theory, leadership, and planning. Examines the impact of communication, legal issues, ethics, and changing social standards. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 9 credit hours in criminal justice or legal studies.

LAW 465  Internship     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: An academic program which offers criminal justice and legal studies majors an opportunity to integrate theory with actual practice. Students spend at least 135 hours in a position related to their major. Anticipated learning objectives are established in a contract agreed to by the student, the on-site supervisor and the course professor. The student will work with the faculty member to identify a topic during the Internship to develop further and present on in LAW 470. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): LAW 325.

LAW 470  Senior Seminar     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Designed for seniors majoring in criminal justice or legal studies; presents selected topics for group discussion, guest speakers, and the exploration of career options. Paper and PowerPoint presentation will be required, based on a topic developed during LAW 365 Practicum I or LAW 465 Internship. This course should be taken during the student's senior year. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and either LAW 365 or LAW 465 or permission of course instructor.

LAW 492  Advanced Selected Criminal Justice Topics     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Senior level students are given the opportunity to study more advanced topics in criminal justice with either full-time faculty or faculty with specialized credentials recruited from outside the University. There may be an applied learning experience with this course, such as a specialized lab component, study away or other related activity. This course is repeatable for credit.

Legal Assistant (LAT)

LAT 101  Introduction to Law     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Examines: the American legal system; the nature and functions of civil law; the function and structure of the state and federal court system and administrative agencies. The course also presents an overview of the trial of a civil lawsuit and a survey of the major areas of civil law.

LAT 115  Paralegal Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Examines the role of the legal assistant in the practice of law. The course will identify paralegal functions, types of employment for paralegals, the structure of a law office and law office systems. The course will examine issues regarding paralegal education, licensing of paralegals, paralegal professional ethics, and the unauthorized practice of law. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent enrollment in LAT 101.

LAT 220  Legal Research     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Students examine the components of a law library. Through research projects and assignments, students gain experience working with law legal reference material including statutes, cases, regulations and annotated summaries of law. Methods of legal writing and citation style are introduced. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent enrollment in LAT 101.

LAT 225  Litigation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Examines the procedures involved in a lawsuit. Subjects covered include: civil court procedures, types of lawsuits, pleadings, pretrial preparation, trial and post-trial procedures. The course will emphasize the role of the various people involved in this process. Prerequisite(s): LAT 220.

LAT 230  Real Property     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Presents the major legal concepts associated with the law of real property and real estate transactions. Emphasis on the historical common law concepts of property; present statutory structure; and common practices in the conveyance and ownership of real estate.

LAT 250  Legal Computer Applications     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Examination of legal applications of computer technology. Students will examine the use of electronic resources to access, acquire, crate and provide information electronically. The course will use commercial and non-commercial sources of information, software, governmental/public domain material (statues, regulations, cases). Students will learn to use personal computers for communication and to explore the Internet, Westlaw, and other electronic sources. Prerequisite(s): Prior computer knowledge or course work is recommended for students, including word processing techniques, the Internet, and e-mail.

LAT 310  Legal Drafting     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Technical skill course where students will learn the fundamentals of drafting legal documents in areas of Property, Torts, Business Organizations, Domestic Relations, and Contracts. Prerequisite(s): LAT 225.

LAT 320  Tort Law     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Studies the law in the areas of personal injury, malpractice and products liability law. Emphasis on the origin of these actions, the present state of the law, and the future in "Tort Reform" and Alternative Dispute Resolution. Prerequisite(s): LAT 101.

LAT 335  Introduction to Mediation     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: In-depth examination of the mediation process. Students will learn methods to promote settlement in disputes.

LAT 340  Study Away in Criminal Justice & Legal Studies     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course focuses on one or more criminal justice and legal studies issues and the institutions responsible for the creation and execution of the law (i.e., the judicial branch, the legislative branch and/or the executive branch of this or another country). Content of the course varies, but includes an applied learning experience involving travel to another part of the United States or another country. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of credit. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 college credit hours or instructor's permission.

LAT 360  Probate Law     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Studies the origins and the present legal framework for the law of inheritance, guardianship/conservatorship, and trusts. Includes general principles of law, terminology, and theoretical basis of Probate. Prerequisite(s): LAT 101.

LAT 365  Selected Topics in Peace & Conflict Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Specialized course work in interpersonal and/or international conflict studies. May be repeated as content varies for a maximum of 9 credits.

LAT 370  Domestic Relations     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Studies the law and court procedures concerning family relations. Emphasis will be on marriage and its validity, divorce, legal separation, child custody and visitation, child support and maintenance, guardianship, paternity, adoption and the Family Court. Students will research and write about issues concerning family law. Prerequisite(s): LAT 101.

LAT 400  Advanced Legal Research     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Students will integrate the use of the law library and computer legal research tools to develop advanced legal research and writing skills. Legal research and writing exercises will be used to prepare students to perform these more advanced tasks in a law office environment or in post-graduate work. Methods of legal writing and citation will be addressed as well. Prerequisite(s): LAT 220 and LAT 250 or permission of course instructor.

LAT 420  Civil Rights Law     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Substantive law course examining actions brought by individuals who claim that their rights, under the United States Constitution, have been violated. Course will cover 42 U.S.C. Section 1983, Writ of Habeas Corpus, and actions brought directly under the United States Constitution. Prerequisite(s): LAT 101 or permission of course instructor.

LAT 430  Conflict Management     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Examines non-litigation forms of resolving legal disputes. Emphasis will be placed on Negotiation, Mediation and Arbitration.

LAT 492  Selected Legal Topics     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Provides students with the opportunity to examine specialized or advanced topics of law. Topics will be offered on a rotating basis. These topics will usually be an in-depth examination of a subject introduced in other LAT courses. This course is repeatable for credit.

Policing (POL)

POL 100  Critical Aspects of Policing I     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Utilizing concepts of substantive criminal law and criminal procedure, students will learn the appropriate application of criminal statutes as well as alternative methods of resolution. Topics include tactical communication and methods for overcoming communication obstacles when dealing with highly emotional matters commonly encountered in policing. Also examined will be various technical aspects of patrol operations and criminal investigations. This course will be one of a series of courses designed to meet Missouri POST requirements for a Class A License for Peace Officer Certification. (Note: A Peace Officer License does not empower the recipient with the authority to arrest or enforce any of the laws of the State of Missouri. This will occur only after the recipient has been employed and commissioned by a law enforcement agency.) Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Law Enforcement Academy Training Director.

POL 130  Critical Aspects of Policing 2     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Builds on the foundations of Critical Aspects of Policing I. Through the integration of theory and practice students will continue to develop expertise for dealing with problems encountered by law enforcement officers. Emphasis will be placed on the development of proficiency and professionalism in interpersonal perspectives, as well as legal and technical areas of policing. This course will be one of a series of courses designed to meet Missouri POST requirements for a Class A License for Peace Officer Certification. (Note: A Peace Officer License does not empower the recipient with the authority to arrest or enforce any of the laws of the State of Missouri. This will occur only after the recipient has been employed and commissioned by a law enforcement agency.)

POL 150  Police Methods and Operations     Credits: 6-12

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course will cover a broad range of topics and utilize field experiences combined with critical thinking techniques to reinforce theory. Subjects will include legal aspects of policing, fundamentals of personal health safety, methods of public service and protection, and use laboratory and practical experiences to develop expertise in the use of instrumentation and equipment commonly employed by law enforcement. This course will be one of a series of courses designed to meet Missouri POST requirements for a Class A License for Peace Officer Certification. (Note: A Peace Officer License does not empower the recipient with the authority to arrest or enforce any of the laws of the State of Missouri. This will occur only after the recipient has been employed and commissioned by a law enforcement agency.) Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Law Enforcement Academy Training Director.

Social Work (SWK)

SWK 250  Introduction to Social Work     Credits: 4

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Overview of professional social work practice including its history, philosophy, ethics, values, methods, and fields of practice. Forty hours of volunteer experience in an area human service agency required. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 and either PSY 101 or SOC 110, or departmental approval.

SWK 260  Introduction to Aging Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Overview of the physical, social, psychological, cultural, and economic aspects of aging, all from a social problems perspective; social policy and social work intervention issues pertaining to aging.

SWK 270  Selected Topics in Social Work     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Study of a selected problem in social work practice, e.g., mental illness, chemical dependence, or child welfare. Course may be repeated for credit for each different topic.

SWK 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Social Work     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research methods in social work. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving social work-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Consent of department.

SWK 320  Philosophy and Policy in Social Services I     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Historical significance of social legislation, its impact on the individual and society; social philosophy, social service, and social change. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in SWK 250, PSC 101, and either ECO 101 or ECO 260.

SWK 325  Family and Child Welfare     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: This course examines the field of family and child welfare. Students will explore the history of child welfare, the critical issues facing families and children in our society, the scope of family and child welfare services, and the social, political, legal and economic forces that shape family and children programs. Students will study families from a strengths-based, ecological perspective and will build sensitivity to various family forms, cultural patterns and issues that stem from social and/or economic injustice. Prerequisite(s): ENG 108.

SWK 330  Human Behavior and the Social Environment I     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social-spiritual-cultural behavior within a systems framework, with an emphasis on individuals and families. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, a grade of C or higher in SWK 250, and BIO 101, or departmental approval.

SWK 340  Human Behavior and the Social Environment II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social-spiritual-cultural behavior within a systems framework with a focus on groups, communities, organizations, and institutions. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or higher in SWK 330.

SWK 345  Substance Abuse and Dependence     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Provides an overview of the substance abuse and dependence field within a bio-psycho-social framework. The course will cover current and historical patterns of drug use; etiological theories and connected research; substance abuse effects on individuals, families, and society; physiological, psychosocial, and cultural aspects of psychoactive substances; basic pharmacology of alcohol and other abused substances; socio-cultural values and their implications for public policy and prevention; assessment and diagnosis of substance abuse/dependence disorders; substance abuse and dependence in special populations, overview of the treatment process and service delivery systems; the recovery process, relapse and relapse prevention and the impact of substance abuse and recovery on family systems. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 or SOC 110.

SWK 350  Social Work Practice I     Credits: 4

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Introduces generalist social work practice with individuals and families. Covers the nature of social work practice, practice theory, ethics and values, the social work relationship, interviewing, the problem-solving process, assessment, planning, intervention, and practice evaluation. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, a grade of C or higher in SWK 250, and a grade of C or higher or concurrent enrollment in SWK 330.

SWK 360  Social Work Practice II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Continuation of SWK 350. Focuses on group work within the generalist social work perspective. Covers group theory, ethics and values, problem-solving process, assessment, planning, intervention, and practice evaluation applied to task and treatment groups. Prerequisite(s): Declared Social Work major, SWK 330, credit or concurrent enrollment in SWK 340 and a grade of C or higher in SWK 350.

SWK 365  Death And Dying     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Cultural views and customs regarding death and dying; stages of death and dying; abnormal grief reactions, issues pertaining to children and death, role of spirituality; functions of health care systems and interdisciplinary teams.

SWK 415  Social Work Practice III     Credits: 4

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Continuation of SWK 350 and SWK 360. Applies the planned change process to interventions with organizations, communities and institutions within the generalist social work perspective. Students complete a community development/organizing project in a local community. Prerequisite(s): Declared social work major and a grade of C or higher in both SWK 340 and SWK 360.

SWK 420  Philosophy and Policy in Social Services II     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Continuation of SWK 320. Analyzes the philosophy and policies of presently active social agencies; policy reforms and evaluation of their possible effectiveness. Prerequisite(s): Declared social work major and a grade of C or higher in SWK 320.

SWK 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Declared social work or interdisciplinary studies major and departmental approval.

SWK 465  Advanced Research Project     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Students will design and conduct an empirical research project focused on a relevant social issue or concern. Same as SOC 465. Prerequisite(s): PSY 300 or equivalent with departmental approval and a grade of C or higher in SOC 460.

SWK 480  Practicum in Social Work     Credits: 10

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Students spend a minimum of 456 hours in an agency setting under the supervision of trained social work professionals. To be taken concurrently with SWK 485. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite(s): Formal acceptance into the social work practicum program, a minimum of 2.5 overall GPA and a grade of C or better in SWK 250, SWK 320, SWK 330, SWK 340, SWK 350, SWK 360, SWK 415 and SWK 420, and a grade of C or higher in all other SWK courses.

SWK 485  Social Work Practicum Seminar     Credits: 2

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Focuses on the development and enhancement of the student's practice skills and the integration of practicum and class content. Taken concurrently with SWK 480. Prerequisite(s): Declared social work major, formal acceptance into the Practicum Program; a minimum of 2.5 GPA, a grade of C or higher in SWK 250, SWK 320, SWK 330, SWK 340, SWK 350, SWK 360, SWK 415 and SWK 420, and a grade of C or higher in all other SWK courses.

Pamela Clary (2007) Assistant Professor, Social Work. A.A., Highland Community College; B.S., Kansas State University; M.S.W., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Jana Frye (2014) Assistant Professor, Social Work. B.S., Truman State University; M.S.W., University of Kansas.

Suzanne Godboldt (2012) Associate Professor, Criminal Justice. B.S., Florida Southern College; M.A., Sam Houston State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Joanne Katz (1991) Professor, Legal Studies. B.A., J.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Suzanne Kissock (2005) Associate Professor, Legal Studies. B.A., St. Louis University; J.D., St. Louis University School of Law.

Gregory Lindsteadt (2005) Chairperson and Professor, Criminal Justice. B.S., University of Nebraska; M.S., Central Missouri State University; Ph.D., Indiana University.

Matthew Loehr (2014) Assistant Professor, Social Work. B.A., Benedictine College; M.S.W., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

David Marble (2013) Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice. B.A., Brigham Young University; M.P.A., University of Utah; M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas.

Montella Smith (2013) Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice. A.A., A.A.S., Community College of Baltimore County; B.A., University of Baltimore; J.D., University of Baltimore School of Law.

David Tushaus (1999) Professor, Legal Studies. B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia; M.A., J.D., University of Iowa.

Gregory Vecchi (2016) Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice. B.S., Park College; M.S., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University.

Kip Wilson (1990) Associate Professor, Criminal Justice. A.S., B.S., Missouri Western State College; M.A., Ed.S., Central Missouri State University.