Department of Economics, Political Science & Sociology

Dr. John Courington, Chairperson
jcourington@missouriwestern.edu
(816) 271-4403
www.missouriwestern.edu/EPSS

The discipline of Economics studies the ways in which people make choices as they assume the various roles of consumer, worker, small business owner, business or non-profit manager, investor, government policymaker, and the like. The manner in which the economy is organized determines the opportunities available to individuals for achieving their goals in a wide variety of areas, and it is one of the key factors affecting the quality of life in any society. Recently, with the increasing reliance upon free market economic principles at home and around the globe, students across the country have demonstrated a renewed interest in the study of economics. The background they acquire will serve them well whether they are preparing for careers in business, government or the non-profit sector, or plan to enter graduate school or law school.

The discipline of political science studies political institutions, the political behavior of groups, and the political behavior of individuals within groups. More specifically, the discipline of  political science includes the study of American and foreign entities, political history, constitutional and policy issues, interest groups, and the media. Although the field is sufficiently diverse to cover virtually any topic of a political nature, a traditional curriculum comprised of several subfields is widely recognized and is included in the political science major at MWSU.

Sociology is the study of group life, social interaction, and relationships in society. Sociology deals with issues relevant to people and social life. Sociology is concerned with such topics as: marriage and the family; urban and rural life; crime; social class; race and ethnicity; sex and gender; demographic changes; environment; technology and communication-to name a few.  Sociology addresses these and other pressing contemporary issues by applying both a specific body of theory as well as the systematic methods of scientific research.

Admission to Political Science major

Students desiring to major in Political Science must formally declare a major by meeting with a Political Science faculty member and complete a Pre-Declaration of Major form. Applicants will be assigned a Political Science faculty advisor at that time. Applicants must have completed the following courses before their major applications will be considered: PSC 101 American National Government and ENG 104 College Writing and Rhetoric, with a grade of C or higher in each. 

Economics (ECO)

ECO 101  Current Issues in the Economy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Introductory course covering current economic events and economic problems facing society. Topics include health care, the environment, crime and poverty, globalization, and recession and growth in the national economy. As the economic aspects of these issues are explored, the student is introduced to the methods used by economists to analyze problems and to develop possible solutions.

ECO 260  Principles of Macroeconomics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Introduction to basic principles of economics with emphasis on the analysis of unemployment, GDP, inflation, and public debt; discusses fiscal and monetary theories and public policies.

ECO 261  Principles of Microeconomics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: Introduction to economic fundamentals with emphasis on supply and demand analysis, factor markets, different market structures, international economics, and various economic problems.

ECO 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Economics     Credits: 1-6

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research methods in Economics. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving economics-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval.

ECO 300  Statistics for Economics and Social Sciences     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Basic statistical techniques emphasizing economic and social science applications. Topics covered include data summary techniques, elementary probability theory, sampling and sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of General Studies math requirement other than MAT 110.

ECO 310  Agricultural Economics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Analysis of the evolution and status of the agricultural sector of the economy. Domestic and export markets will be analyzed, as will impact of agricultural policy. Special emphasis will be directed to the Midwestern regional economy as influenced by the agricultural food chain.

ECO 360  Intermediate Macroeconomics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Intermediate-level theory course examines determinants of GDP, employment, and inflation; emphasizes economic model building (both classical and Keynesian) and the use of monetary and fiscal policies to control business cycles and inflation. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260.

ECO 361  Intermediate Microeconomics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Theoretical approach to the behavior of the individual buyer and seller in the marketplace; includes consumer demand theory, costs of production, and market structures ranging from pure competition to monopoly. Prerequisite(s): ECO 261.

ECO 362  Public Finance     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Studies principles of taxation and public expenditures, impact of fiscal policy on economic and social activity, and recent trends in public finance at the federal, state, and local levels. LAS Ethics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 and ECO 261.

ECO 363  Money and Banking     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Summer.

Course Description: Continuation and expansion of money and banking concepts introduced in ECO 260; includes money, banks, and other financial intermediaries, the Federal Reserve System, concepts of monetary control, monetary policy, and international banking. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260.

ECO 364  Labor Economics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Introductory course dealing with the institutional aspects of the American labor force, its organization, wage and employment theory, the economic role of bargaining, and the basic ingredients of public policy toward labor organizations. Prerequisite(s): ECO 261.

ECO 365  Government Regulation of Business     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Analyzes the legislative and legal control of business and its implications for the various economic components of the American economy. LAS Ethics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 and ECO 261.

ECO 367  Urban and Regional Economics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Examines economic growth in the United States with emphasis on the problems of economic growth in the Midwest; looks at factors instrumental in determining economic growth in various segments of the economy; considers urban problems associated with growth. LAS Writing. Prerequisite(s): ECO 261.

ECO 375  Economics of Health Care     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Examines the application of economic theory to the health care industry. Topics include the demand for health and health care, the market for health insurance, managed care, the market for health care practitioners, hospital services, and pharmaceuticals, and the role and operation of Medicaid and Medicare. Current proposals for reform of the health care system and of government health care policy will be carefully examined. LAS Ethics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 261.

ECO 376  Economics of the Environment     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Application of economic principles and insights to environmental issues, and to the development of potential remedies. Areas of examination include valuing the environment and sustainable development, natural resource economics (incl. energy, water, and biodiversity), and environmental economics (incl. air, land, and water pollution, and poverty and development). LAS Ethics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or ECO 261.

ECO 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-6

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Declared Economics major, a minimum of 2.5 GPA in major field, and departmental approval.

ECO 460  Business and Economic Forecasting     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Basic and intermediate forecasting of business and economic variables. Forecasting of business variables such as sales, production, and stock prices. Economic forecasts of GDP, unemployment, and consumer prices. Techniques include judgmental methods, trend calculation, smoothing techniques, time series methods, and regression analysis. LAS Computer Literacy. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 and either ECO 300 or GBA 210 or MAT 132.

ECO 461  International Trade     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Introduction to the theory of international economics, with an emphasis on economic models of trade and on economic arguments for and against the use of trade barriers. The course examines the changing nature of international economic institutions and increasing world economic interdependence. LAS International/Intercultural. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 and ECO 261.

ECO 462  History of Economic Thought     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Development of various schools of economic thought: includes classical, neoclassical, institutional, Keynesian, and neo-Keynesian theories. LAS Writing. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260.

ECO 463  Comparative Economic Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Introduction to the comparative study of national economic organization. Analysis of alternative patterns of reliance on national economic planning versus market activity. Examines experiences in different types of national economies such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden, Japan, the republics of the former Soviet bloc, and China. LAS International/Intercultural. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260.

ECO 464  Econometrics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduces methods and statistical tools utilized by economists to perform basic and applied research. Regression analysis is the focus, with emphasis on both theoretical issues and problems encountered in application. Students will experience the research process firsthand, with ample opportunities to collect and analyze their own data. LAS Computer Literacy. Prerequisite(s): Either ECO 260 or ECO 261 and either ECO 300 or GBA 210 or MAT 132.

ECO 466  Economics in Action     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: In-depth study of one of the following specialty areas in economics taught on a rotational basis each semester offered. Content will cover such topics as: Economics of Crime and Justice, International Finance, Mathematical Economics, Economics of Sport, or Economics and the Media. Course may be repeated for credit up to five times with different topics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or ECO 261.

Political Science (PSC)

PSC 101  American National Government     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: The American constitutional system, including Congress, the presidency, and the courts; and public issues.

PSC 110  American State and Local Government     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Colonial and revolutionary origins of state government; state constitutions; referendum, initiative, and recall procedures; state legislatures; governors; state courts; county and municipal governments. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 111  Understanding the Missouri Constitution     Credits: 1

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: This course provides students with an overview of the Missouri Constitution. Includes a discussion of federalism, the historical development, key constitutional structures and the Missouri Bill of Rights. The course is open to transfer students needing to complete the state mandated graduation requirement for knowledge of the Missouri Constitution.

PSC 200  International Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The nature of politics at the international level; the national state system and state capabilities; foreign policy objectives, formulation, and execution; international organizations and alignments; contemporary world tensions. LAS International/Intercultural. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 210  Comparative Political Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Structural-functional analysis of major European political systems; comparison and contrast among such systems and with others of contemporary significance. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 280  Scope and Methods     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: The way political scientists work; the scientific basis for the discipline of Government; the history, approaches, and major sub-fields of Government the quantitative and qualitative research methods used to analyze politics.

PSC 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Government     Credits: 1-2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research methods in political science. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving government-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval.

PSC 300  Political Parties, Elections, and Voting Behavior     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Evolution of the American two-party system; place of the interest group in decision making through interaction with executive and legislative branches. LAS Computer Literacy. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and PSC 110.

PSC 310  Political Theory     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Political theories of classical thinkers, Plato and Aristotle; of church fathers, Augustine and Aquinas; and of modern theorists, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill; Marxism and Fascism. Same as PHL 310. LAS Ethics; LAS Writing. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 or any previous course in philosophy or humanities.

PSC 312  Contemporary Political Philosophy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Political theories since the mid-twentieth century to the present including movements such as libertarianism, neo-conservatism, neo-liberalism, communitarianism, feminism, and environmentalism. Same as PHL 312. LAS Ethics. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 or any previous course in philosophy or humanities.

PSC 314  Technology and Society     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Participatory course emphasizing a particular problem and/or issue related to technology and society. Class participants will investigate the semester's theme using currently available technologies. Same as BIO 314, ENG 314, HUM 314, PSY 314. Prerequisite(s): Completion of Category One -- Basic Skills General Studies courses.

PSC 317  Gender and Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course offers an introduction to feminist analysis and to the consideration of the gender system in a political context and from a political perspective. It invites participants to both read and carry out empirical research and consider the insights and contributions of various paradigms, especially intersectionality.

PSC 320  Public Administration     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Organization theory; bureaucracy; public personnel and policy; issues in American public administration. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 330  Urban Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: The growth of cities and metropolitan areas; the legal status of local governmental entities; politics and elections and the role of interest groups in governing the metropolis; and the functions and services of urban governments. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 340  Latin American Political Systems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Comparative approach to Latin American political institutions; investigates causes for political instability, revolution, the new military, socialism vs. communism, and economic development and U.S. policy. LAS International/Intercultural. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and either PSC 200 or PSC 210.

PSC 350  Judicial Process     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An exploration of the judicial process in the United States, including the institutions and considerations that affect the administration of justice under law in the American political system. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and PSC 110.

PSC 355  Interest Group Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An examination of interest groups and the interest group process in the U.S., both in national and state arenas. Attention is given to the role and function of interest groups in society, the interest group process itself, problems, and the use of case studies to illustrate the process in action. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 360  The American Presidency     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: The place of the president in decision making in the American federal system, his constitutional roles, the legal and extra-legal checks on presidential power. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 365  Selected Topics in Peace & Conflict Studies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Specialized course work in interpersonal and/or international conflict studies. May be repeated as content varies for a maximum of 9 credits.

PSC 370  American Public Policy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A survey of the policy process and specific policies or issues in government selected from a variety of areas, such as crime and punishment, health and welfare, bioethical, education, energy, environment, spending, taxation, civil liberties, immigration, and homeland security. LAS Ethics; LAS Writing. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 374  Exploring War and Peace in the Modern World     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: This class provides an interdisciplinary survey of the root causes of conflicts and methods by which societies can build peace. There is a specific emphasis on the multiple meanings of peace in society and the challenges embedded in contemporary, applied peace-making.

PSC 375  Seminar on Terrorism and Homeland Security     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: This class is a survey of domestic and international terrorism focusing on major terrorist groups and their actions throughout the world. Root causes of terrorism will be examined and domestic and international reactions to terrorism will be explained and evaluated. There is a special emphasis in this class on the U.S. Homeland Security response to terrorism. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 380  Asian Politics     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Comparative approach to Asian politics and culture. This course pays special attention to Japanese governance, culture and leadership as well as emerging governments and economies in Southeast Asia. Relations with the United States are also examined. LAS International/Intercultural. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 390  International Organizations     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of the role of international organizations in constituting and reconstituting world order with a focus on providing governance under conditions or anarchy. Covers a range of organizations with special attention given tot he role of the United Nations in maintaining international peace and stability. LAS Writing. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 400  American Foreign Policy     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Policy making, the role of the public in decisions, formulation and implementation of national policy, U.S. policy goals in various areas of the world, decision making in crisis situations. LAS International/Intercultural. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and PSC 200.

PSC 410  The Legislative Process     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: The American Congress, its organization, rules, role in law making; the role of interest groups, congressional investigations, and the modern presidency in the legislative process. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 420  Constitutional Law     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: The role of the Supreme Court in the American system; judicial review and its significance under Marshall, Fuller, Taft, Hughes, and Warren; majority and minority opinions; the process of decision making. LAS Writing. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101.

PSC 426  Peace and Justice in Post-Conflict Societies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: This course addresses issues of building peace in war-torn societies by focusing on a range of political, military, economic, and social challenges and how they intersect with institutions of the state. Emphasis on four separate sectors around which institutionalizing peace are organized: security, justice and reconciliation, governance and participation, and social and economic issues. Special attention is given to connecting the theoretical literature on conflict transition to the applied challenges of post-war societies. Prerequisite(s): PSC 101 and PSC 200.

PSC 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic or an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Declared political science major, a minimum of 2.5 GPA, and departmental approval.

PSC 490  Capstone Practicum in Political Science     Credits: 3-12

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: An integrative, research based capstone experience for senior political science majors. Students arrange an internship with a public agency, governmental organization, or private group or agency that interacts with government subject to the approval of the Department of Economics, Political Science, & Sociology via its political science faculty. The field work will provide first-hand experience with the operations, institutions, and policy concerns of cooperating agencies, organizations, and groups in addition to providing data necessary to complete the original research component of the practicum. Student internship positions in a state or local government setting require PSC 110. Internships must be arranged and approved by the department in the semester preceding the internship. Supervised internships are not offered during summer session. For more details contact the Coordinator of the Internship Practicum in the EPSS department. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and PSC 280.

Sociology (SOC)

SOC 110  Introduction to Sociology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

Course Description: An introduction to the discipline of sociology; basic sociological concepts and theories; a survey of the major topics such as culture, society, social interaction, groups, crime, race/ethnicity, class, gender, the family, education, religion, medicine, economy, politics. Cross-cultural comparisons.

SOC 120  General Anthropology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: The bio-cultural evolution of the human species, with emphasis on culture as adaptation for survival; comparison of human non-literate societies, stressing cultural variability, cultural relativity, and similarities between cultures.

SOC 200  Introduction to Archaeology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The language, methodology, theoretical frameworks and history of the field of archaeology, with special emphasis on excavations and their contribution to knowledge of past civilization.

SOC 230  Social Problems     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: An analysis of contemporary American social problems, such as poverty, social inequality, crime and law enforcement, health and health care, population and the environment, problems in the family, education, politics and the economy. Global comparisons. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 283  Introduction to Research Methods in Sociology     Credits: 1-2

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Introduction to basic research methods in sociology. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving sociology-related research problems. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval.

SOC 300  Selected Topics In Sociology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Specialized area of investigation of a selected topic or problem in sociology that is not listed in the catalog. May be repeated for credit for each different topic. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 or departmental approval.

SOC 310  Deviant Behavior     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Introduction to the basic research, theories and topics that characterize this area of Sociology including, but not limited to such topics as substance abuse, sexual deviance, violence, mental illness and other behaviors considered deviant in American society. Cross-cultural comparisons are made whenever possible. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 315  Social Inequality and Stratification: Class, Power and Wealth     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A survey of the nature, causes, and consequences of social inequality in advanced capitalist societies (e.g., North America, Europe, and Japan) and the Third World. Explores the distribution of income, wealth, power, and prestige based on gender, race, age, and physical and other attributes. Investigates the reasons for prosperity and poverty and their effects on life choices, careers, and opportunities. LAS International/Intercultural. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 325  World of Islam: People, Cultures & Societies     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An introduction to the fundamentals of Islam, and a survey of cultures, traditions, social life, and history of Islamic societies. The course provides an interpretation of current events in the world of Islam. Special topics of interest would include: the origin and history of Islam; religious life (belief and practices, and observance); Islamic cultures; Islamic arts, literature, and architecture; economic applications of Islam; Islamic laws and theology; marriage and Muslim families; women's rights and position in Muslim families and society; political Islam (Islamic groups: modern and militant Islamic movements, the question of leadership); and, Islam and the West. The course is, however, open to the type of interests that students show in the subject matter.

SOC 330  The Family     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: The family as a basic institution; the structure and functions of the modern family in a changing urban environment. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 360  Sociology of Health, Illness and Medicine     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: A sociological analysis of health, illness and medicine; the impact of the physical, social, economic and political factors on the production and distribution of illness, disease, sickness and health care. International comparisons. LAS Ethics. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 370  Mediterranean Archaeology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Uses the principles of basic archaeology to investigate the history and artifactual remains of the major cultures which occupied the land surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, including the Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Hellenistic and Roman periods. Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or departmental approval.

SOC 373  Sociology of Sport and Physical Activity     Credits: 2-3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Emphasizes the fundamental premise that sport is a microcosm of society. Develops an understanding of the principles that create, sustain, and transform social organizations through sport as well as the structure, processes, and problems of sport as a form of social organization. Investigates how the theory and methodology of sociology can be used to understand the principles of stability and change in the conduct of sport.

SOC 400  Racial and Ethnic Relations     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: An analysis of the major racial/ethnic groups in the United States; group conflicts and their sources such as prejudice, discrimination, ethnocentrism, racism; majority-minority relations; critical issues such as affirmative action, immigration. A brief comparison with other societies such as Canada, Northern Ireland, the Middle East, Brazil, South Africa. LAS International/Intercultural. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 430  Criminology     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Explanations of criminal behavior; relationship between crime and social factors such as social class, age, gender, occupation; types of crimes; crime statistics; crime victims; the criminal justice system: the police, courts, corrections; ethical and other critical issues such as capital punishment, crime and mental illness, juvenile crime and punishment. International comparisons. LAS Ethics. Prerequisite(s): SOC 110.

SOC 440  Sociological Theory     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: An analysis of both classical and contemporary sociological theories and their application to historical and current events. LAS Writing. Prerequisite(s): Completion of nine credit hours in sociology.

SOC 450  Independent Research/Project     Credits: 1-3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, declared sociology major, a minimum 3.0 GPA in major field, and departmental approval.

SOC 460  Methods of Social Research     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall.

Course Description: Tools, methods, ethical and theoretical foundation of research process; investigates hypothesis construction, empirical techniques for collecting and analyzing data, and testing their validity; employs computers and statistical analysis as appropriate to the social sciences. LAS Computer Literacy. Prerequisite(s): Completion of nine credit hours in sociology (at least 3 credit hours numbered 300 or higher).

SOC 465  Advanced Research Project     Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: Students will design and conduct an empirical research project focused on a relevant social issue or concern. Same as SWK 465. Prerequisite(s): PSY 300 or equivalent with departmental approval and a grade of C or higher in SOC 460.

SOC 490  Internship in Sociology     Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Acquaints the student with the practical aspect of sociology; encourages sociological thinking. Students study a social issue by working as volunteer interns for an organization, office, or agency in the community. To enroll, the student must submit a proposal to the sociology faculty member who will supervise the internship process. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, declared sociology major or minor, completion of at least 15 credit hours in sociology, a minimum of 3.0 GPA in major field, and permission of the instructor.

John Courington (2008) Chairperson and Professor, Economics. B.S., Arizona State University; M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

Jonathan Euchner (1993) Assistant Professor, Political Science. B.A., University of Northern Iowa; M.A., University of South Carolina; Ph.D. University of Kentucky.

Reza Hamzaee (1984) Professor, Economics. B.S., National University of Iran; M.A., University of California-Santa Barbara; Ph.D., Arizona State University.

Ali Kamali (1996) Professor, Sociology. B.A., National University of Iran; M.A., University of Detroit; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Joachim Kibirige (1991) Associate Professor, Sociology. B.A., Makerere University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Melinda Kovacs (2012) Assistant Professor, Political Science. M.A., ELTE, Hungary; M.A., Central European University; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Catherine Lawson (1995) Professor, Economics. B.A., University of Colorado-Denver; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder.

Patrick McMurry (1978) Professor, Economics. B.S., Southwest Missouri State University; M.A., Central Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Arkansas.

Edwin Taylor (2010) Associate Professor, Political Science. B.A., M.P.A., Montana State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Oregon.